Cobb method

Cobb method

(kob),
a technique used in scoliosis to determine the degree of curvature of the spine; the measurement is made by drawing a perpendicular to a line drawn across the superior endplate of the upper-end (most tilted) vertebra and the inferior endplate of the lower-end vertebra; the angle formed by the intersection of the two perpendicular lines is the Cobb angle, which is the measure of the magnitude of the curve.

Cobb meth·od

(kob meth'ŏd)
A technique to determine the degree of curvature of the spine. The measurement is made by drawing a line perpendicular to a second line drawn across the superior endplate of the upper-end (most tilted) vertebra and the inferior endplate of the lower-end vertebra; the angle formed by the intersection of the two perpendicular lines is the Cobb angle, which is the measure of the magnitude of the curve.

Cobb,

Stanley, U.S. neuropathologist, 1887-1968.
Cobb chisel
Cobb curet
Cobb gouge
Cobb method
Cobb osteotome
Cobb periosteal elevator
Cobb retractor
Cobb spinal elevator
Cobb syndrome - cutaneous angiomas, usually in a dermatomal distribution on the trunk, associated with vascular abnormality of the spinal cord and resulting neurologic symptoms. Synonym(s): cutaneomeningospinal angiomatosis
Cobb technique
References in periodicals archive ?
The Cobb method, developed in 1948 by a researcher of the same name, is still considered the "gold standard" for scoliotic curve measurement (9).
An observational and cross-sectional study was conducted to compare this new non-radiographic method with the traditional Cobb method using a direct numerical correlation between both methods.
It was possible to mathematically correlate the angular measurements of the scoliotic curve obtained by the Cobb method (MC) and by the method of the present study (MR).
Therefore, in this case, the value of the measurement obtained by the present study will be equal to that obtained by the Cobb method.
It is important to point out that this demonstration does not represent a general solution; however, it provides an understanding of the phenomenon observed in this experimental and statistically proven study, highlighting the equivalence between the measurement obtained in this study and that obtained by the Cobb method.
The values of the curves obtained by the computerized photogrammetry method were similar to the values obtained by the Cobb method. The difference between the two methods was lower for thoracic curves than for lumbar curves, with values of 2.9[degrees] and 5.1[degrees], respectively.
Comparison between the measurements of the scoliotic curves obtained by the Cobb method and the computerized photogrammetry method for (A) thoracic curves and (B) lumbar curves.
(7) The Scoliosis Research Society has established the Cobb method as the standard of measurement to evaluate scoliotic curves and their progression, because it is both simple to perform, and accurate when evaluating repeated measurements.
The Cobb method of mensuration determines the degree of scoliotic curvature by the angle created between lines drawn on endplates of the end vertebrae (superior endplate of upper end vertebra; inferior end plate of lower end vertebra).
Twin A had a single AP standing radiograph taken at 4 years 11 months of age which demonstrated a 10 degree right lumbar scoliosis measured using the Cobb method between L2 and L5.
This was associated with a 30 degree right thoraco-lumbar scoliosis measured using the Cobb method between T12 and L4 which had developed below the anomaly.