sequoia

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Related to Coastal redwood: Western Skunk Cabbage

sequoia

either of two huge Californian coniferous trees (the redwood Sequoia sempervivens or the giant sequoia Sequoiadendron giganteum), that can reach heights of up to 100 metres and are the largest terrestrial organisms. They are among the oldest living organisms in the world, taking perhaps 2000 years to reach their mature size. The oldest sequoia, called General Sherman, is thought to be between 3000 and 4000 years old, standing 83 metres tall and with a diameter of more than 9 metres.
References in periodicals archive ?
In essence, these measures enable the coastal redwood to pass the test of time and truly stand out on the forest floor.
Their tree collection includes ancient oaks, a Handkerchief Tree, so-called because the pure-white bracts it produces in spring look like waving handkerchiefs; and spectacular Giant and Coastal Redwoods.
They're planting at least 20,000 coastal redwood trees a year in Lane and Douglas counties, according to the Cottage Grove seedling grower Plum Creek.
The coastal redwood, Sequoia sempervirens, grows at a foot a year and the tallest known is 112m, the tallest trees on earth, while the oldest is a mere 2,200-years-old, so plant one now and the family can shelter under it for the next few millennium parties.
In the initial phase, the original football field and track were removed and replaced with a large soccer-sized activity field, surrounded by a 6-foot-high grass berm, coastal redwood, and alder trees.
pittieri should be extended to include other sites and times that may receive different proportions of fog (mist) and rain-water inputs, such as recent work of Dawson (1996) working in the fog-inundated coastal redwood forests of northern California.
l RED R Cmth fo REDWOOD, CALIFORNIA: Also on my to do list is a visit to the coastal redwood forests of California.
Prone on the ground, the tree stretches almost 300 feet from root wad to tip--nearly a football field in length--and this coastal redwood isn't even one of the giants of the Redwood National and State Parks (managed cooperatively by the National Park Service and California State Parks).
True, the tech industry thrives here, and Stanford is among the nation's most beautiful campuses, but the city named for a 250-year-old coastal redwood tree offers much more: some of the finest dining and merchandise in the West.
Forest Giants of the Pacific Coast, by Robert Van Pelt (Global Forest Society/University of Washington Press, $35), leads off with the giant sequoia and the coastal redwood, but then concisely describes and discusses 18 other western giants, among them the Jeffrey pine, western hemlock, and yellow cedar.
Coastal redwood forests have the greatest biomass of any ecosystem in the world, but it's a sobering thought, if you are hiking through one, to realize that 95 percent of that biomass is hanging above your head.
A natural coastal redwood forest is a perfect recycling system.

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