coal tar

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tar

 [tahr]
a dark brown or black viscid liquid from the wood of various species of pine, or found as a by-product of the destructive distillation of bituminous coal (see coal tar). It is a complex mixture, the source of organic substances such as cresol, creosol, naphthalene, paraffin, phenol, and toluene. Formerly used as an oral medication in treatment of various conditions, it has been found to be toxic and carcinogenic and now has only limited topical use in certain skin diseases.
coal tar a by-product obtained in destructive distillation of bituminous coal; if its fumes are inhaled or if it is ingested in its natural state, it is toxic and carcinogenic. A preparation is used in ointment or solution in treatment of eczema and psoriasis.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

coal tar

(kōl tar),
A by-product obtained during the destructive distillation of bituminous coal; a dark semisolid of characteristic naphthalenelike odor and a sharp, burning taste; used to treat skin diseases.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

coal tar

n.
A viscous black liquid containing numerous organic compounds that is obtained by the destructive distillation of coal and used as a roofing, waterproofing, and insulating compound and as a raw material for many dyes, drugs, and paints.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
A blackish, semisolid by-product of the destructive distillation of bituminous coal, which contains benzene, naphthalene, phenols, and other organic compounds; coal tar is used to treat psoriasis, and may induce clearance of psoriatic plaques
Cons Unpleasant odour, carcinogenic
Coal tar is usually combined with UVB light
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

coal tar

Therapeutics A blackish, semisolid byproduct of the destructive distillation of bituminous coal, which contains benzene, naphthalene, phenols, and other organic compounds; CT is used to treat psoriasis, and may induce clearance of psoriatic plaques Cons Unpleasant odor, carcinogenic; CT is usually combined with UVB light. See Psoriasis.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

coal tar

A complex mixture of organic substances, especially polycyclic hydrocarbons, derived from the distillation of coal. Although the action of this mixture is not well understood, coal tar preparations are used empirically to treat various skin disorders such as ECZEMA and PSORIASIS. The drug is on the WHO official list. It is contained in numerous trade preparations such as Baltar, Capasal, Carbo-Dome, Gelcotar, Pentrax, Polytar, Psoriderm and Tar Band.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
In the light of the directions issued by the government, Deputy Commissioner Islamabad Capt.Mushtaq Ahmed while taking action u/s 144, had sealed six godowns in the area of Tarnoal, for allegedly selling substandard coal-tar. He also had confiscated hundreds of drums of smuggled coal-tar besides registering cases against the godown owners who were arrested.
Meanwhile, Deputy Commissioner Islamabad called on the Chief Minister in Islamabad and informed him about the action taken against those selling substandard coal-tar.
Coal-tar epoxy coatings have some limitations, perhaps even more severe than those for high-gloss enamel-type epoxy coatings.
The undesirable properties that coal-tar epoxies exhibit are limiting their application in many treatment plant areas where they were previously used.
On hand were EPA documents that described the hazards of coal-tar contamination, including one stating that windblown dust can carry arsenic.
Although the presence of asbestos in coal-tar wrap was known to NMGas(tm)2 by way of its procurement documents, the issue of friability as related to public and worker health concerns was never questioned.
Subsequently, another NYS-highway construction project caused the removal, handling and disposal of two miles of coal-tar wrapped pipe at a cost of nearly $1 million.
During the process, millions of square feet of coal-tar wrap containing asbestos was removed by mechanical means generating large amounts of airborne dust, debris and waste.
Activities performed by distribution companies where asbestos containing coal-tar wrap is encountered are fundamentally different than the transmission work.
* What is the significance of the bound nature of the coal-tar wrap in general; of the layer of asbestos felt within the coal-tar wrap and the release of individual asbestos fibers upon removal of the coal-tar wrap in Niagara Mohawk's maintenance efforts?
* Is the coal-tar wrap "friable" within the definition of Industrial Code Rule 56, i.e.
* What is your opinion of the safety risk to workers and the public when using traditional (hand) methods of coal-tar wrap removal?