coagulopathy

(redirected from Coagulation disturbance)
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Related to Coagulation disturbance: Coagulation defects

coagulopathy

 [ko-ag″u-lop´ah-the]
any disorder of blood coagulation.
consumption coagulopathy disseminated intravascular coagulation.

co·ag·u·lop·a·thy

(kō'ag-yū-lop'ă-thē),
A disease affecting the coagulability of the blood.

coagulopathy

/co·ag·u·lop·a·thy/ (ko-ag″u-lop´ah-the) any disorder of blood coagulation.
consumption coagulopathy  disseminated intravascular coagulation.

coagulopathy

[kō·ag′yəlop′əthē]
a pathologicalondition that reduces the ability of the blood to coagulate, resulting in uncontrolled bleeding.

coagulopathy

Hematology A clotting defect in which bleeding does not stop in the usual time period Etiology Hemophilia, drug-induced defects–eg, aspirin, thrombocytopenia, liver disease, Von Willebrand's disease. See Consumption coagulopathy, DIC, Leukemic coagulopathy.

co·ag·u·lop·a·thy

(kō-ag'yū-lop'ă-thē)
A disease affecting the coagulability of the blood.

Coagulopathy

A disorder in which blood is either too slow or too quick to coagulate (clot).
Mentioned in: Cerebral Palsy

coagulopathy

any disorder of blood coagulation. See also hemophilia.

consumption coagulopathy
a bleeding tendency due to a reduction in clotting factors caused by their utilization. See also disseminated intravascular coagulation.
disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (DIC)
see disseminated intravascular coagulation.
hepatic coagulopathy
impaired synthesis of most clotting factors, including factors I, II, V, VII, IX and X, as well as other substances involved in the fibrinolytic system, in severe liver disease can cause significant abnormalities in coagulation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Even considering these shortfalls, there is a growing body of evidence indicating that in order to improve survival in the seriously injured we need to address the possibility of a coagulation disturbance much earlier than was previously thought.
Metabolic acidosis has been incriminated as one of the instigators of coagulation disturbances following injury.
13,14] Given the incidence of hyperchloraemia in our patient population, which in addition to hypoperfusion may contribute to metabolic acidosis, acute kidney injury and coagulopathy, the BD may be a more useful predictor of the risk of coagulation disturbances and an indicator for the early use of plasma rather than clear fluids for resuscitation.
Tissue factor exposure has been incriminated as a major trigger mechanism, [2,15] and it may be assumed that a higher ISS would be associated with more severe tissue damage, an increase in coagulation disturbances and a higher mortality rate.