coagulopathy

(redirected from Coagulation disturbance)
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Related to Coagulation disturbance: Coagulation defects

coagulopathy

 [ko-ag″u-lop´ah-the]
any disorder of blood coagulation.
consumption coagulopathy disseminated intravascular coagulation.

co·ag·u·lop·a·thy

(kō'ag-yū-lop'ă-thē),
A disease affecting the coagulability of the blood.

coagulopathy

/co·ag·u·lop·a·thy/ (ko-ag″u-lop´ah-the) any disorder of blood coagulation.
consumption coagulopathy  disseminated intravascular coagulation.

coagulopathy

[kō·ag′yəlop′əthē]
a pathologicalondition that reduces the ability of the blood to coagulate, resulting in uncontrolled bleeding.

coagulopathy

Hematology A clotting defect in which bleeding does not stop in the usual time period Etiology Hemophilia, drug-induced defects–eg, aspirin, thrombocytopenia, liver disease, Von Willebrand's disease. See Consumption coagulopathy, DIC, Leukemic coagulopathy.

co·ag·u·lop·a·thy

(kō-ag'yū-lop'ă-thē)
A disease affecting the coagulability of the blood.

Coagulopathy

A disorder in which blood is either too slow or too quick to coagulate (clot).
Mentioned in: Cerebral Palsy

coagulopathy

any disorder of blood coagulation. See also hemophilia.

consumption coagulopathy
a bleeding tendency due to a reduction in clotting factors caused by their utilization. See also disseminated intravascular coagulation.
disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (DIC)
see disseminated intravascular coagulation.
hepatic coagulopathy
impaired synthesis of most clotting factors, including factors I, II, V, VII, IX and X, as well as other substances involved in the fibrinolytic system, in severe liver disease can cause significant abnormalities in coagulation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Following its efficacy in the hemophilia population, there has been an increasing body of clinical experience with rFVIIa in the nonhemophiliac population with coagulation disturbances and bleeding of various etiologies.
Preliminary experience with the use of recombinant factor VIIa to treat coagulation disturbances in pediatric patients.
Conclusion: Recombinant factor VIIa can be used to effectively reverse coagulation disturbances in the pediatric patient even when treatment with fresh frozen plasma has failed.
Various etiologic factors may be responsible for coagulation disturbances in children, including congenital deficiencies; hepatic insufficiency; disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) from sepsis, shock, or closed head injury; dilution of coagulation factors after cardiopulmonary bypass or large-volume transfusions; and medications.
In addition, in selected cases, despite the administration of significant volumes of FFP, coagulation disturbances may persist.
The etiologies of the coagulation disturbances are listed in Table 1.
There are now reports regarding the administration of rVIIa to approximately 22 nonhemophiliac pediatric patients with acquired coagulation disturbances.
In all of our patients, these factors were addressed, and coagulation disturbances persisted despite a platelet count greater than 100,000/[mm.
Various etiologic factors may be responsible for coagulation disturbances in children, including congenital deficiencies, hepatic insufficiency, disseminated intravascular coagulation, dilution of coagulation factors from large-volume transfusions, and medications.