co-sleeping

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co-sleeping

Bed-sharing Pediatrics The sleeping of an infant or child in a parent's bed Pros Intimate contact with parent during critical formative period of infancy Cons Risk of death–±60 occur/yr in the US–due to suffocation, strangulation in bed clothing, or overlying. See Overlying.
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You should not co-sleep if: | Either you or anyone in the bed smokes (even if you do not smoke in the bedroom); | Either you or anyone in the bed has recently drunk any alcohol; | You or anyone in the bed has taken drugs that make you feel sleepy; | Your baby was born prematurely (before 37 weeks of pregnancy) or weighed under 2.5kg or 51/2lb when they were born.
"If he was in his cot, I'd have been checking on him all the time, just to make sure he was breathing and alright!" There are different ways to co-sleep for those worried about accidentally squashing their child, points out Joanne Jewell, founder of Mindful Parenting.
01 ( ANI ): Turns out, mothers who co-sleep with infants beyond six months may feel more depressed and judged by others.
I want to co-sleep but I need to be able to do it safely with my baby and the co-sleeper gets rid of that fear.
Bed-sharing "is common and seen as a healthy bonding experience in many cultures worldwide; warmth, protection, and a sense of well-being are factors suspected as being incentives to co-sleep" (Sobralske & Gruber, 2009, p.
Parents reported that their son's sleep difficulties had caused considerable distress for them both, particularly when they began allowing their son to co-sleep with them.
This meant holidays would always screw up his sleep patterns since we would inevitably co-sleep in hotel rooms or he would suffer from jetlag.
@sedw still think many parents told 'mustn't co-sleep' & that is end of conversation #CPHVAtt
Luckily, the types of disturbances most often seen in those who co-sleep are relatively minor, says Dr Carney, such as brief wake-ups and poorer quality of sleep.
Researchers Qillin and Lee have previously reported that breastfeeding mothers who co-sleep sleep more than both those who do not co-sleep and those that formula feed.