copayment

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copayment

(kō′pā′mənt)
n.
A specified sum of money that patients covered by a health insurance plan pay for a given type of service, usually at the time the service is rendered.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

co·pay·ment

, copay (kōpā-mĕnt, kōpā)
A fixed or set amount paid for each health care or medical service; the remainder is paid by the health insurance plan. In common parlance, copay is the term used.
See also: coinsurance, cost sharing
Synonym(s): out-of-pocket costs, out-of-pocket expenses.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

co·pay·ment

, copay (kōpā-mĕnt, kōpā)
That portion of a dental care charge for which the patient herself, rather than a third party payor (i.e., insurer), is responsible.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Recently, Pharmacy Benefits Managers and insurers have begun to impose a "co-pay accumulator," which means the only payments that can be applied to your deductible are the dollars that came directly from your pocket.
The new programme offers eligible patients a maximum of USD 5,000 in co-pay assistance each calendar year for co-pay, co-insurance and deductible expenses associated with their treatment without regard for their ability to pay.
One reason, she says, is that until fairly recently, Massachusetts prohibited the use of co-pay cards.
- What needs are not being met in pharma marketing with co-pay card programs today?
About 72 percent to 74 percent have to pay a co-pay for an office visit, but only 15 percent to 19 percent pay coinsurance amounts for office visits, according to the MEPS data.
Part B has an annual deductible of $147 and co-pays of 20%, and a lifetime penalty for late enrollment.
Plan participants pay a higher co-pay to see a medical specialist than to a primary care physician.
In a July 31 letter to the committee's Democrat and Republican leadership signed by 26 lab organizations and industry members, including AMT, the coalition registered its "strongest opposition to the implementation of a Medicare clinical laboratory co-pay," and warned that the lab community would oppose any healthcare reform bill that included such a provision.
In these situations, the question is "what is the optimum mix of benefits, future co-pay and premium, appropriate for a given client's finances?"
According to the VA, some veterans received phone calls from a man indicating he was from the "VA pharmacy" who asked veterans for their Social Security number and a list of medications because of "new co-pay regulations." Officials said the caller told the veterans they owe $800 because of a co-pay change at the VA and asked for credit card information to pay the bills.