comorbidity

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comorbidity

 [ko″mor-bid´ĭ-te]
1. a comorbid disease or condition.
2. the state of being comorbid.
3. the extent to which two pathological conditions occur together in a given population.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

co·mor·bid·i·ty

(kō'mōr-bid'i-tē),
A concomitant but unrelated pathologic or disease process; usually used in epidemiology to indicate the coexistence of two or more disease processes.
[co- + L. morbidus, diseased]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

comorbidity

The simultaneous presence of 2+ morbid conditions or diseases in the same Pt, which may complicate a Pt's hospital stay; in the US health care system, comorbidity carries considerable weight in determining the reasonable length of hospitalization under the DRG classification of diseases. See DRGs.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

co·mor·bid·i·ty

(kō-mōr-bid'i-tē)
1. A concomitant but unrelated pathologic or disease process.
2. epidemiology Coexistence of two or more disease processes.
[co- + L. morbidus, diseased]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
If we use the number or frequency of co-morbidities as our definition of risk (see next page), we will observe a direct correlation between co-morbidity count and health care expenditures.
Very large and complex wounds which were expected to heal over prolonged time with post healing sequelae, wounds infected with resistant organisms with persistent discharge rendering inability to successful graft uptake, presence of wounds with co-morbidity, extensive war wounds with limited alternate reconstructive options were included in the study.
Second, to assess the relationship between pre-operative co-morbidity, as defined by the CCI, and post-operative complications outlined by the Clavien-Dindo classification.
(1,2) Co-morbidity with psychiatric and other neurodevelopmental disorders seems to be a distinct clinical characteristic, although the reasons and mechanisms for the same have not been fully elucidated.
Of the 182 patients, 122(67%) did not have any other co-morbid conditions, while 60 patients (33%) had associated co-morbidity (Table 2), such as diabetes mellitus in 38 (21%) patients and hypertension in 4(2%) patients.
The Charlson co-morbidity index was used to describe co-morbidity burden and calculated for each participant from medical history data (Liu et al., 2010).
In the UAE, the prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus is among the highest in the world, ensuring that this co-morbidity is a substantial risk factor for pneumococcal disease," she said.
Adjusting for maternal age, parity, ethnicity and co-morbidity, mean total costs were 23% higher among overweight women and 37% higher among obese women compared with women with normal weight.
The rest of book details use of CBT for GAD in practice, from assessment through interventions and relapse prevention, in addition to co-morbidity and complicating factors.
At the same time it is known that severe hypoglycaemia is a potential risk factor for cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetics, although the association is controversial and the possible effects of co-morbidity have not been fully investigated.
To quantify the potential impact, the CWCI research determined that paid losses on claims with the obesity co-morbidity averaged $116,437, or 81.3 percent more than those without; and that these claims averaged nearly 35 weeks of lost time, or 80 percent more than the 19-week average for claims without the obesity co-morbidity.
In workers' compensation, obesity has historically been classified as a co-morbidity -- a condition that occurs at the same time, but usually independent of, an injury or illness, the report said.