coevolution

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co·ev·o·lu·tion

(kō'ev-ō-lū'shŭn),
The process whereby genes or gene fragments are changing together and not diverging.

coevolution

(kō′ĕv-ə-lo͞o′shən, -ē-və-)
n.
The process by which two or more interacting species evolve together, each changing as a result of changes in the other or others. It occurs, for example, between predators and prey and between insects and the flowers that they pollinate.

co′ev·o·lu′tion·ar·y adj.
co′e·volve′ (-ĭ-vŏlv′) v.

coevolution

the evolution of unrelated organisms that has taken place together because of the special link between them, e.g. insects and the flowers they pollinate (see ENTOMOPHILY), parasites and their host, members of a symbiotic relationship (see SYMBIOSIS). The ARUM LILY is a notable example, attracting small flies.
References in periodicals archive ?
Other studies have examined the macro co-evolution of industry structure and distinctive capabilities of firms within the industry (e.
1997), institutions (Nelson and Winter 1977) and co-evolution (Levinthal 1992; Van de Ven and Garud 1994; Lewin and Volberda 1999).
Our results imply that dynamic co-evolution of human hosts and their pathogens has played an important role in shaping human variation.
Descriptors: co-evolution, search behaviour, capabilities, competitive regimes, multi-level research, strategic renewal, music industry
Resnikoff and Wells present students, academics, and general-interest readers with the third edition of their examination of co-evolution of mathematics and human progress.
Among the topics are inferring processes of Neolithic gene-culture co-evolution using genetic and archaeological data: the case of lactase persistence and dairying, evaluating the appearance and spread of domestic caprines in the southern Levant, early stock-keeping in Greece, the origin of stock-keeping and spread of animal exploitation strategies in the Early and Middle Neolithic of the North European Plain, and zoological data from Late Mesolithic and Neolithic sites in Switzerland about 6000-3500 BC, and earlier Neolithic subsistence in Britain and Ireland as seen through faunal remains and stable isotopes.
Dilcher added that co-evolution with insects gave angiosperms an evolutionary advantage.
Papers from the conference are collected here, in sections on panoramic views of the cosmic dawn, galaxy structure formation, the global histories of mass assembly, galaxies at different evolutionary stages, clusters of galaxies, the co-evolution of galaxies and BHs/AGNs, the local universe, and future prospects.
The book has four themes: blind variation selection and retention, multilevel co-evolution, process-level analysis and modelling, epistemology and methodology.
The Co-evolution of Language and Kinship: Alan Barnard (University of Edinburgh).
Here, we will turn the problem around and exploit these differences to understand the co-evolution of GCsand their host galaxies.
The author has organized the ten chapters that make up the main body of his text in three sections devoted to language ecology, language and co-evolution, and conversation styles.