thrombolysis

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thrombolysis

 [throm-bol´€ĭ-sis]
dissolution of a thrombus.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

throm·bol·y·sis

(throm-bol'i-sis), Avoid the mispronunciation thromboly'sis.
Fluidifying or dissolving of a thrombus.
[thrombo- + G. lysis, a dissolving]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

thrombolysis

(thrŏm-bŏl′ĭ-sĭs)
n. pl. thromboly·ses (-sēz)
Dissolution or destruction of a thrombus.

throm′bo·lyt′ic (-bə-lĭt′ĭk) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

thrombolysis

Dissolution of a blood clot/thrombus. See Laser thrombolysis.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

throm·bol·y·sis

(throm-bol'i-sis)
Liquefaction or dissolving of a thrombus.
[thrombo- + G. lysis, a dissolving]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
While the numbers were small one patient (0.3 percent) on standard treatment experienced a bleed, compared with six (1.7 percent) of those who received clot-busting drugs and none of the bleeds was fatal, any increase in bleeding is a red flag.
The standard treatment at present is the administration of clot-busting drugs to dissolve the clot.
"These devices--the Solitaire Flow Restoration Device and the Trevo Retriever--appear to dramatically improve survival in individuals who suffer a stroke and are ineligible for the clot-busting drug or fail to respond to the drug," says Maurizio Fava, MD, Vice-Chair of the Department of Psychiatry at MGH.
When clot-busting drugs cannot be used or are ineffective, the clot can sometimes be mechanically removed during, or past, the four-and-a-half-hour window.
The clinical decision support software system used electrocardiogram (ECG) results and patient information entered into the system by paramedics to determine the probability the patient was having a heart attack and, if so, whether a cardiac procedure or clot-busting drugs were appropriate.
A new clot-busting drug, ticagrelor (Brilinta), may soon take the place of clopidogrel (Plavix) for treating patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS), which includes angina and heart attack.
The original service at the Royal Liverpool University Hospital was expanded so more patients could benefit from a clot-busting wonder drug.
Patients who receive clot-busting drugs such as tenecteplase followed by angioplasty within six hours after suffering a myocardial infarction have a 36 percent reduction in life-threatening complications compared to patients treated with standard care, according to a study in the June 25 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.
People who have had a common kind of heart attack should get artery-clearing angioplasty within six hours after taking clot-busting drugs to prevent more damage, a study found.
Currently victims of severe heart attacks receive clot-busting drugs in their local hospital.
Currently the most common treatment for heart attacks is thrombolysis, the injection of clot-busting drugs, but angioplasty is now considered a more effective alternative.
Those who can't be treated within the deadline will be given a clot-busting drug and taken to specialist centres at Clydebank and East Kilbride, near Glasgow.