Clostridium sordellii


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Clostridium sordellii

a bacterial strain that produces multiple toxins including a lecithinase, hemolysin, and a fibrinolysin, which results in edema and potentially fatal hypotension, and necrotic infections in humans. It is especially associated with abdominal and gynecologic posttraumatic and postoperative wound infection; also causes big head in rams.

Clos·trid·i·um sor·del·li·i

(klos-trid'ē-ŭm sōr-del'ē-ī)
A bacterial species that produces multiple toxins including a lecithinase, hemolysin, and a fibrinolysin, which results in edema and potentially fatal hypotension, and necrotic infections in humans. It is especially associated with abdominal and gynecologic posttraumatic and postoperative wound infection; also causes disorder called big head in rams.

Clostridium sordellii

A species that may cause anaerobic infections in bones, joints, soft tissues, the uterus, and elsewhere.
See also: Clostridium
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Postmortem colorectal swabs collected from pelicans B to F and submitted for culture grew large numbers of Clostridium sordellii.
Purification and characterization of Clostridium sordellii lethal toxin and cross-reactivity with Clostridium difficile cytotoxin.
In order to evaluate the effect of two bacterial inocula isolated from the cecum on cecal fermentation and total feed digestibility in growing rabbits, a growth essay was carried out with 60 New Zealand White rabbits of 38 days of age, with three treatments: TI= commercial diet (control); T2= TI plus Clostridium sordellii inoculum; T3 = T1 plus Peptostreptococcus tetradius inoculum.
Chris Lewis said he was also sure that confirmed cases of Clostridium sordellii infection were only the tip of the iceberg and that the problem was under-diagnosed as a cause of sudden death in sheep flocks because the symptoms of infection are so similar to other conditions.
While Aldape's study looks at Clostridium sordellii infections in general, Beverly Winikoff confines her remarks to the implications of the study for chemical/RU486 abortions.
There were 12 separate cultures on tissue recovered from the donor, none of these cultures were positive for Clostridium sordellii.
But to understand why it seems unlikely that the vaginal administration of the misoprostol could be the factor behind these deadly infections, one simply needs to understand a bit more about the Clostridium sordellii bacteria.
Clostridium sordellii has been confirmed as the cause of sepsis in four women who died in the United States following the use of Mifeprex (mifepristone) for medical abortion, the Food and Drug Administration reported.
Blood cultures obtained from patient 1 before his death grew a clostridial species that was identified subsequently at MDH and CDC as Clostridium sordellii by biochemical and molecular typing.
In November 2005, the FDA determined that four earlier deaths that occurred in California from 2003 to 2005 were the result of infections from a bacterium called Clostridium sordellii.
Clostridium sordellii has been confirmed as the cause of sepsis in four women who died in the United States after use of Mifeprex (mifepristone) for medical abortion, the Food and Drug Administration reported.