Clostridium difficile

(redirected from Clostridium dificile)
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Related to Clostridium dificile: Clostridium difficile colitis

Clos·trid·i·um dif·fi·cile

Avoid the mispronunciation dĭf-ĭ-sēl' of this Latin word, which is correctly pronounced dĭ-fĭs'ĭ-lē.
a bacterial species found in feces of humans and animals. It colonizes newborn infants, who are spared from toxin-induced diarrheal disease. Pathogenic for human beings, guinea pigs, and rabbits; frequent cause of colitis and diarrhea following antibiotic use. Found to be a cause of pseudomembranous colitis and associated with a number of intestinal diseases that are linked to antibiotic therapy; also the chief cause of nosocomial diarrhea.
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Clostridium difficile

(dĭf′ĭ-sēl′, dĭf′ĭ-sēl′, dĭf′ĭ-kē′lā)
n.
A bacterium that causes an infectious form of severe diarrhea especially in elderly people on antibiotic therapy and in hospitalized patients. Also called C. diff..

Clostridium difficile

A common cause of bacterial colitis; it is the causative agent in 99% of pseudomembranous colitis, and 20-30% of antibiotic-associated diarrhea

Clos·trid·i·um dif·fi·ci·le

(klos-trid'ē-ŭm di-fis'i-lē)
Gram-positive obligate anaerobic or microaerophilic, rod-shaped bacterium; causes sometimes severe antibiotic-associated colitis.
Synonym(s): C-Diff, CDT.
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Clostridium difficile

A fecal organism endemic in hospitals and responsible for the majority of hospital-acquired cases of diarrhoea in elderly patients. Its prevalence in hospital is largely due to the high levels of antibiotic usage. Bowel infection can be cleared by oral treatment with the antibiotic vancomycin which is not appreciably absorbed into the bloodstream. Up to 40 percent of hospitalized patients are colonized with this organism. Only about 3 percent of healthy adults carry it. A previously uncommon strain with variations in toxin genes has emerged as a cause of C. difficile -associated disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
"We ask all who have been touched by bugs MRSA or Clostridium Dificile to support us by writing to their MP on the subject."
Further, the inappropriate use of broad spectrum antibiotics, often for long periods, is not without personal (e.g., Clostridium dificile infection, allergies, and other adverse reactions) and societal (e.g., contribution to the development of resistant strains such as methicillin- and vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus) risks.
The trust has also seen a rise in reported "never events" - serious incidents that should never occur - and is also coming under pressure against a challenging target for keeping cases of clostridium dificile (c.diff) infection to a minimum this year.
Health trusts and hospital staff have been under the cosh in recent years with countless stories of outbreaks of so-called superbugs such as MRSA and Cdif (Clostridium dificile) raising questions over the quality of hospital cleanliness.
The trust, which runs James Cook University Hospital in Middlesbrough, is also coming under pressure against its target for keeping cases of clostridium dificile (c.diff) infection to a minimum this year.
Around pounds 2m being pumped into the region's hospitals from a pounds 50m national fund to help stop the spread of the superbug Clostridium dificile, often called the "new MRSA".

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