Clostridium


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Clostridium

 [klo-strid´e-um]
a genus of gram-positive, obligate anaerobic or microaerophilic, spore-forming, rod-shaped bacteria. Several species cause gas gangrene, including C. bifermen´tans, C. histioly´ticum, C. no´vyi, C. perfrin´gens (the most common cause), and C. sep´ticum. Other species are C. botuli´num, the cause of botulism; C. diffi´cile, the cause of antibiotic-associated colitis; and C. te´tani, the cause of tetanus.

clostridium

 [klo-strid´e-um] (pl. clostri´dia) (L.)
any individual of the genus Clostridium.

Clostridium

(klos-trid'ē-ŭm),
A genus of anaerobic (or anaerobic, aerotolerant), spore-forming, motile (occasionally nonmotile) bacteria (family Bacillaceae) containing gram-positive rods; motile cells are peritrichous. Many species are saccharolytic and fermentative, producing various acids and gases and variable amounts of neutral products; other species are proteolytic, some attacking proteins with putrefaction or more complete proteolysis. Some species fix free nitrogen. These organisms sometimes produce exotoxins; they are generally found in soil and in the mammalian intestinal tract, where they may cause disease. The type species is Clostridium butyricum.
[G. klōstēr, a spindle]

clos·trid·i·um

, pl.

clos·trid·i·a

(klos-trid'ē-ŭm, -ă),
A vernacular term used to refer to any member of the genus Clostridium.

clostridium

(klŏ-strĭd′ē-əm)
n. pl. clostrid·ia (-ē-ə)
Any of various rod-shaped, spore-forming, chiefly anaerobic bacteria of the genus Clostridium, such as certain nitrogen-fixing species found in soil and those causing botulism and tetanus.

clos·trid′i·al (-əl) adj.

Clos·trid·i·um

(klos-trid'ē-ŭm)
A genus of anaerobic (or anaerobic, aerotolerant), spore-forming, motile (occasionally nonmotile) bacteria containing gram-positive rods. Exotoxins are sometimes produced by these organisms. They may cause disease in humans and other animals. They are generally found in soil and in the intestinal tract of humans and other animals. The type species is C. butyricum.

clos·trid·i·um

, pl. clostridia (klos-trid'ē-ŭm, -ă)
A vernacular term used to refer to any member of the genus Clostridium.

Clostridium,

Any bacterium of the genus Clostridium . These are rod shaped and spore-forming and mostly able to reproduce in the absence of free oxygen (anaerobic). The genus includes Clostridium welchii which causes gas gangrene, Clostridium tetani which causes TETANUS and Clostridium botulinum which causes BOTULISM.

Clostridium

A genus of deadly bacteria that are responsible for tetanus and other serious diseases, including botulism and gangrene from war wounds. Clostridia thrives without oxygen.
Mentioned in: Tetanus

Clos·trid·i·um

(klos-trid'ē-ŭm)
Genus of anaerobic, spore-forming, motile bacteria that may cause disease in intestinal tract.
References in periodicals archive ?
Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) leads to significant morbidity, mortality, and treatment failures.
Clostridium perfringens is a gram positive, anaerobic rod shaped bacteria belonging to genus Clostridium and is responsible for production of terminal spores (Hughes et al., 2007).
In this study we found that 8 cases from 25 cases were admitted to renal unit were renal failure in dialysis and 2 cases from these 8 cases were showed positive growth on Clostridium difficile and we found that, 50% of renal failure on dialysis cases including two cases of the previous showed positive test for toxin A\B and 50% of cases show negative test for toxin A\B and this was in agreement with a study which indicated that, the dialysis process might be at high risk for the development of C.
Clostridium perfringens es un bacilo grampositivo encapsulado, anaerobico, productor de esporas, que se encuentra en la flora habitual del colon (esta presente en el 66 % de la poblacion sana) y en el tracto genital femenino.
An investigation into the association between cpb2encoding Clostridium perfringens type A and diarrhea in neonatal piglets.
Ockert, "Fulminant liver failure following infection by Clostridium perfringens," Surgical Infections, vol.
Moretti et al., "Community-acquired Clostridium difficile infection in children: A retrospective study," Digestive and Liver Disease, vol.
Burden of Clostridium difficile infection in the United States," The New England Journal of Medicine, vol.
In general, the pathogenic species of Clostridium are not invasive.
Final blood cultures returned on HD3 as Clostridium perfringens, with the source presumed to be endometritis.
Key words: Clostridium sordellii, Clostridium perfringens, avian clostridiosis, myonecrosis, enteritis, cytotoxins, avian, brown pelican, Pelecanus occidentalis