Clonote

A term for the product of somatic cell nuclear transfer, a technique used in cloning, to distinguish it from an embryo produced by in vitro fertilisation, a technique that results in more natural artificial reproduction for which the products are appropriately called zygotes or, in later stages, embryos
References in periodicals archive ?
McHugh, Zygote and "Clonote"--The Ethical Use of Embryonic Stem Cells, 351 NEW.
(34.) Paul McHugh advances a very similar argument; McHugh, "Zygote and 'Clonote,'" 210.
He concluded by endorsing Paul McHugh's suggestion that human SCNT blastocysts, if they were ever successfully created, ought be called "clonotes" rather than "zygotes" or "embryos." (16)
Moreover, the fact that 1 to 3 percent of cloned animal blastocysts survive to birth suggests that at least 1 to 3 percent of these "clonotes" were able to pass through all the stages of embryological
(84) Paul McHugh, "Zygote and 'Clonote'--The Ethical Use of Embryonic Stem Cells," New England Journal of Medicine, vol.
(164) Paul McHugh, "Zygote and "Clonote"--The Ethical Use of Embryonic Stem Cells," New England Journal of Medicine, vol.
McHugh, "Zygote and 'Clonote': The Ethical Use of Embryonic Stem Cells," New England Journal of Medicine 351, no.
(76) Cloned human embryos' lack of a human teleological trajectory leads the authors to reject referring to clones as either embryos or blastocysts and instead to suggest the new term clonotes. (77) It is hoped that this change in nomenclature will better convey the idea that cloned human embryos cannot become human beings and thus will help defeat moral objections to research cloning.