symptom

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symptom

 [simp´tom]
any indication of disease perceived by the patient.
cardinal s's
1. symptoms of greatest significance to the health care provider, establishing the identity of the illness.
2. the symptoms shown in the temperature, pulse, and respiration.
dissociation symptom anesthesia to pain and to heat and cold, without impairment of tactile sensibility.
objective symptom one perceptible to others than the patient, such as pallor, rapid pulse, rapid respiration, or restlessness.
presenting symptom the symptom or group of symptoms about which the patient complains or from which he seeks relief.
signal symptom a sensation, aura, or other subjective experience indicative of an impending epileptic or other seizure.
subjective symptom one perceptible only to the patient, such as pain, pruritus, or vertigo.
withdrawal s's withdrawal (def. 2).
symptom (omaha) in the omaha system, on the fourth level of the problem classification scheme, the subjective evidence of a client problem as reported by the client or by a significant other; this is closely related to the problem modifier actual. See also sign/symptom.

symp·tom

(simp'tŏm),
Any morbid phenomenon or departure from the normal in structure, function, or sensation, experienced by the patient and indicative of disease.
See also: phenomenon (1), reflex (1), sign (1), syndrome.
[G. symptōma]

symptom

A subjective manifestation–eg, nausea, light-headedness, itching, of a morbid condition reported by a person; often used loosely for signs or other evidence used of a particular condition. See B symptom, Cancer symptom, Cognitive symptom, Concomitant symptom, First rank symptom, Homeopathic symptom, Negative symptom, Positive symptom, Shake & bake symptom. Cf Sign.

symp·tom

(simp'tŏm)
Any morbid phenomenon or departure from the normal in structure, function, or sensation, experienced by the patient and indicative of disease.
See also: phenomenon (1) , reflex (1) , sign (1) , syndrome
[G. symptōma]

symptom

A subjective perception suggesting bodily defect or malfunction. Symptoms are never perceptible by others. Objective indications of disease are called signs.

symptom

any change in normal function or activity associated with a particular disease.

sign 

Objective evidence of a disease as distinguished from symptom, which is a subjective complaint of a patient. See diagnosis; prognosis.
Argyll Robertson sign See Argyll Robertson pupil.
Bell's sign Bell's phenomenon occurring on the affected side in Bell's palsy.
Bjerrum's sign See Bjerrum's scotoma.
Cogan's lid twitch sign A twitch of the upper eyelid in an eye with ptosis when the patient is asked to look in the primary position following a downward look. The eyelid then returns to its ptosis position. This condition occurs in myasthenia gravis.
Collier's sign Unilateral, or more commonly bilateral, eyelid retraction that exposes an unusual amount of the sclera of the eye above and below the iris; it gives the person a frightened or startled expression. It is due to a midbrain lesion. See Parinaud's syndrome.
sign convention A set of conventions regulating the direction of distances, lengths, and angles measured in geometrical optics. The most common is the New Cartesian Sign Convention. It stipulates: (1) All distances are measured from the lens, refracting surface or mirror. Those in the same direction as the incident light, which is drawn travelling from left to right, are positive. Those in the opposite direction are negative. (2) All distances are measured from the axis. Those above are positive. Those below are negative. (3) Angles are measured from the incident ray to the axis, with anticlockwise angles positive and clockwise angles negative. (4) The power of a converging lens is positive and that of a diverging lens is negative (Fig. S7). See focal length; Lagrange's law; law of refraction; Newton's formula; fundamental paraxial equation.
Dalrymple's sign Retraction of the eyelids causing an abnormally widened palpebral fissure, in primary gaze. This is a sign of Graves' disease. The patient appears to stare and to be frightened as some white sclera may be seen above the upper limbus.
doll's eye sign See doll's head phenomenon.
von Graefe's sign Immobility or lagging of the upper eyelid when looking downward. This is a sign of Graves' disease.
Gunn's crossing sign Tapering of veins on either side of the arteriovenous crossings seen in hypertensive retinopathy.
Hutchinson's sign A triad of signs present in congenital syphilis. They are interstitial keratitis, notched teeth and deafness.
local sign See oculocentric direction.
Moebius' sign Convergence weakness occurring in Graves' disease.
Mizuo's sign See Mizuo's phenomenon.
Munson's sign A sign observed in keratoconus in which the lower lid is bulging as a cone when the patient looks downward.
pseudo-von Graefe sign See aberrant regeneration.
Rizzuti's sign An arrowhead pattern near the nasal part of the corneoscleral limbus, sometimes seen in advanced keratoconus.
Salus' sign Retinal vein deflection from its normal course at arteriovenous crossings seen in hypertensive retinopathy.
Seidel's sign See Seidel's scotoma.
Shafer's sign The presence of pigment granules of various sizes floating in the anterior vitreous. They usually result from a retinal break/s, which may progress into rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. Then the pigment cells appear as small black dust-like particles ('tobacco dust') seen on clinical examination.
Vogt's sign Loss of the normal shagreen of the front surface of the crystalline lens indicating anterior capsular cataract. See crocodile shagreen.
Uhthoff's sign See Uhthoff's symptom.
Fig. S7 Sign convention at a spherical refracting surface S (O, object; A, vertex; C, centre of curvature; I, image; n , n ′, refractive indices)enlarge picture
Fig. S7 Sign convention at a spherical refracting surface S (O, object; A, vertex; C, centre of curvature; I, image; n, n′, refractive indices)

symp·tom

(simp'tŏm)
Any morbid departure from normal in structure or function experienced by patient and indicative of disease.
[G. symptōma]
References in periodicals archive ?
According to our results, clinical symptoms did not depend on this parameter.
Chilaiditi syndrome is rare and refers to an interposition of the colon between the liver and the abdominal wall resulting in clinical symptoms. The syndrome was named after Demetrious Chilaiditi, a Greek radiologist who first described three cases of the radiographic anomaly in 1911.
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[5,6] No clinical symptoms may be present in mothers of some of the babies diagnosed with the transient-type MG, the majority of whom are born to mothers diagnosed with MG, or the mothers' disease may be in remission.
Objective: to study the clinical symptoms of patients with the reliable presence of persistent viral infection, to reveal their identity.
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In the present study, we investigate the natural course of AR regarding clinical manifestations of the disorder and immunological responses in a followup of 2 years in children with house dust mite allergy .We evaluate clinical symptoms, in vivo skin responses due to allergen and in vitro allergen-specific effector T cells and Treg cells during the natural course of the disease.
After 2-weeks of treatment clinical symptoms of diabetic angiopathy significantly improved in First group.
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