epidemiology

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epidemiology

 [ep″ĭ-de″me-ol´o-je]
the science concerned with the study of the factors determining and influencing the frequency and distribution of disease, injury, and other health-related events and their causes in a defined human population for the purpose of establishing programs to prevent and control their development and spread. Also, the sum of knowledge gained in such a study.
analytic epidemiology the second stage in an epidemiologic study, in which hypotheses generated in the descriptive phase are tested.
descriptive epidemiology the first stage in an epidemiologic study, in which a disease that has occurred is examined. Data necessary in this phase include time and place of occurrence and the characteristics of the persons affected. Tentative theories regarding the cause of the disease are advanced and a hypothesis is formulated.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ep·i·de·mi·ol·o·gy

(ep'i-dē'mē-ol'ŏ-jē),
The study of the distribution and determinants of health-related states or events in specified populations, and the application of this study to control of health problems.
[G. epidēmios, epidemic, + logos, study]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

epidemiology

(ĕp′ĭ-dē′mē-ŏl′ə-jē, -dĕm′ē-)
n.
The branch of medicine that deals with the study of the causes, distribution, and control of disease in populations.

ep′i·de′mi·o·log′ic (-ə-lŏj′ĭk), ep′i·de′mi·o·log′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
ep′i·de′mi·o·log′i·cal·ly adv.
ep′i·de′mi·ol′o·gist n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

epidemiology

The formal study of health event patterns in a population, their causes and means of prevention. Epidemiology provides the scientific basis for evidence-based medicine and strategies to improve public health.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

epidemiology

1. The study of the distribution of disease and its impact upon a population, using such measures as incidence, prevalence, or mortality.
2. The study of the occurrence and causes of health effects in human populations.
3. The science of public health, which studies the frequency, distribution, and causes of diseases in a population–rather than in an individual, and examines the impact of social and physical factors in the environment on morbid conditions. See AIDS epidemiology, Analytical epidemiology, Cancer epidemiology, Clinical epidemiology, Developmental epidemiology, Intersecting epidemiology, Inverted epidemiology, Prospective epidemiology, Retrospective epidemiology.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ep·i·de·mi·ol·o·gy

(ep'i-dē'mē-ol'ŏ-jē)
The study of the distribution and determinants of health-related states or events in specified populations, and the application of this study to control of health problems.
[G. epidēmios, epidemic, + logos, study]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

epidemiology

The study of the occurrence, in populations, of the whole range of conditions that affect health. It includes the study of the attack rate of the various diseases (incidence) and the number of people suffering from each condition at any one time (prevalence). Industrial and environmental health problems are also an important aspect of epidemiology.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

epidemiology

the study of the incidence, distribution and control of an EPIDEMIC disease in a population.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

epidemiology

A branch of health science that deals with the incidence, prevalence, distribution and aetiology of disease in a population.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann

ep·i·de·mi·ol·o·gy

(ep'i-dē'mē-ol'ŏ-jē)
Study of distribution and determinants of health-related states or events in specified populations and application of results to control health problems.
[G. epidēmios, epidemic, + logos, study]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Subsequent to the classification of the Amplichek II, the FDA added language to the Code of Federal Regulations, codifying the special controls that will apply to assayed quality control material for clinical microbiology assays.
Jacobs, "Falsepositive blood cultures in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia," Clinical Microbiology and Infection, vol.
Deplano et al., "Epidemiological validation of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus," Journal of Clinical Microbiology, vol.
Robin Patel: Mayo Clinic's clinical microbiology laboratory has been performing testing since 1911.
This year's 31 articles include discussion of eukaryotic picoplankton in surface oceans, prospects for the future using genomics and proteomics in clinical microbiology, how viruses and toxins disassemble to enter host cells, gene regulation in Borrelia burgdorferi, and what has been learned from synthetic poliovirus and other designer viruses.
(4) Originally, hospital personnel conducted clinical microbiology training, but during the 1970's and 1980's hospital programs closed as a result of enrollment shortages and rising costs in relation to profits.
Jacobs, professor of clinical microbiology at Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland.
Suitable for research and clinical microbiology, [CO.sub.2] incubators offer a precise control and contamination resistance solution when most critical for mainstream cell culture applications.
A spokesman from the Department of Clinical Microbiology said: "As the majority of doctors surveyed had no objection to not wearing a tie to work surely it is time to sound the death knell for the tie?"

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