medical technologist

(redirected from Clinical Laboratory Technologist)
Also found in: Acronyms.

medical

 [med´ĭ-kal]
pertaining to medicine or to the treatment of diseases; pertaining to medicine as opposed to surgery.
medical assistant a person who, under the direction of a qualified physician, performs a variety of routine administrative and clinical tasks in a physician's office, a hospital, or some other clinical facility.
medical laboratory technician (MLT) see clinical laboratory technician/medical laboratory technician.
medical record administrator one responsible for the indexing, recording, and storage of medical records and reports of patients admitted to hospitals and other health care agencies, and who also prepares reports of births, deaths, transfers, and discharges of patients, and of treatments received.

There are two levels of qualification for the medical record practitioner: Registered Record Administrator (RRA) and Accredited Record Technician (ART). Only those persons who have passed the registration examination of the american health information management association are entitled to use the professional designation of Registered Record Administrator or the job titles of medical record administrator and health record administrator. Only individuals who have passed the accreditation examination of the Association are entitled to use the designation of Accredited Record Technician. Suitable job titles for the RRA might include: Medical Record Administrator; Director, Medical Record Administration Program; Director, Medical Record Services; Instructor; Coordinator; and Research Associate. Suitable job titles for the ART might include: Medical Record Technician; Director; Assistant Director; Supervisor; and Instructor.

medical technologist

medical technologist

A lab worker in the US who has received at least 4 years of formal college or university education (e.g., a bachelor of science degree in medical technology) and training in various techniques in clinical pathology, haematology, microbiology, chemistry, blood banking, immunology, and other areas of the lab.

medical

1. pertaining to or emanating from the study or discipline of medicine, in the context of veterinary science in veterinary medicine.
2. a class of diseases that are traditionally treated by medicines rather than by surgery.

medical ecology
study of the environment and its relationship to a population of animals with respect to the effect of the environment on the diseases of the animals.
problem-oriented medical record
a standardized format for keeping clinical records in a problem-oriented case management system. An early decision is made on what is the nature of the patient's problem or problems and from then on the patient's status with respect to each problem is assessed daily. This has the undeniable advantage that the clinician does not lose sight of the objective with respect to the individual patient. Without this approach there is always an inclination for the clinician to attack the disease and place the patient on a lower priority. The attitude adopted as a result of this approach is very similar to the herd health approach in herd medicine—the objective is the farmer's survival, not the eradication of some bacteria.
medical records
the detailed records, made at the time, of the clinical, clinical pathology and pathology examinations and treatments of each patient, or patient group. The records have importance to the welfare of the patient, and to potential medical research and legal investigations, and to be worth their full value they must be made contemporaneously.
medical technologist
a qualified worker in a paramedical field such as laboratory scientist, veterinary nurse or livestock inspector.
References in classic literature ?
He made a long story of it; but the part that had immediate interest for me was this: He said I was Sir Kay's prisoner, and that in the due course of custom I would be flung into a dungeon and left there on scant commons until my friends ransomed me -- unless I chanced to rot, first.
That ain't the way to get out of being common, old chap.
Yes," he said presently, "I was the first to put stick or stone on Whortleberry Common yonder.
They look upon fraud as a greater crime than theft, and therefore seldom fail to punish it with death; for they allege, that care and vigilance, with a very common understanding, may preserve a man's goods from thieves, but honesty has no defence against superior cunning; and, since it is necessary that there should be a perpetual intercourse of buying and selling, and dealing upon credit, where fraud is permitted and connived at, or has no law to punish it, the honest dealer is always undone, and the knave gets the advantage.
Fortunately for him she had on the other side Lord Faudel, a most intelligent middle-aged mediocrity, as bald as a ministerial statement in the House of Commons, with whom she was conversing in that intensely earnest manner which is the one unpardonable error, as he remarked once himself, that all really good people fall into, and from which none of them ever quite escape.
Controversies and wars among the members themselves have been so common, that the German annals are crowded with the bloody pages which describe them.
By a faction, I understand a number of citizens, whether amounting to a majority or a minority of the whole, who are united and actuated by some common impulse of passion, or of interest, adversed to the rights of other citizens, or to the permanent and aggregate interests of the community.
The Communists are distinguished from the other working-class parties is only: (1) In the national struggles of the proletarians of the different countries, they point out and bring to the front the common interests of entire proletariat, independently of nationality.
But very early in the morning poor Ogilvy, who had seen the shooting star and who was persuaded that a meteorite lay somewhere on the common between Horsell, Ottershaw, and Woking, rose early with the idea of finding it.
Things are said to be named 'equivocally' when, though they have a common name, the definition corresponding with the name differs for each.
If it be from the common people, it is commonly false and naught; and rather followeth vain persons, than virtuous.
It is in the state that that common seeking after the good which is the profoundest truth about men and nature becomes explicit and knows itself.

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