clindamycin

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clindamycin

 [klin″dah-mi´sin]
1. a semisynthetic antibiotic that is a derivative of lincomycin; used to treat gram-positive penicillin-resistant infections.
2. a semisynthetic derivative of lincomycin used systemically, topically, and vaginally as an antibacterial, primarily against gram-positive bacteria; used also as the hydrochloride and phosphate salts and as the hydrochloride salt of the ester of clindamycin and palmitic acid (clindamycin palmitate hydrochloride).
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

clindamycin

(klĭn′də-mī′sĭn)
n.
A semisynthetic antibiotic, C18H33ClN2O5S, derived from lincomycin and active against gram-positive bacteria.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

clindamycin

Infectious disease An antibiotic combined with pyrimethamine to treat and prevent toxoplasmosis, PCP and, topically, for acne vulgaris Adverse effects Diarrhea, dysgeusia. See AIDS.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

clindamycin

An antibiotic drug that penetrates well into bone to treat OSTEOMYELITIS. The drug is on the WHO official list. Brand names are Dalacin C and, for external use, Dalacin T.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The efficacy and safety of a single dose of Clindesse vaginal cream versus a seven-dose regimen of Cleocin vaginal cream in patients with bacterial vaginosis.