clerk

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clerk

 [klerk]
an employee who keeps records and does other general office work.
unit clerk (ward clerk) a worker on a nursing unit who schedules patients for prescribed studies, prepares charts for patients, answers the phone on the unit, and handles other general clerical tasks. In some provinces of Canada, ward clerks of certain types of facilities are also trained to transcribe orders. Called also unit secretary.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

clerk

verb To take a full history, perform a physical examination, record one’s findings in the patient’s notes, and write a problem list and care plan.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Unlike the multi-purpose clerk in the nineteenth century pre-mechanized office, women clerical workers in the early twentieth century rarely enjoyed substantial opportunities for advancement.
But Stobhill nurse Cathy Miller, a Unison official and Labour party member, said: "This strike is not orchestrated by one political party but is to fight for the rights of clerical workers. Many earn as little as pounds 11,000 a year for a phenomenal workload."
Also dismissed for allegedly committing similar acts were a teacher in his 50s last September and two clerical workers, both in their 20s, in October the same year.
Since 1995, BACE has conducted a Vital Links training at least once a year, bringing K-12 instructional assistants and clerical workers together--often more than 100 each time.
Compounding this difficulty, large corporations in the area often lure civilian employees, adversely impacting PCSO's efforts to attract and retain 911 operators, computer programmers, clerical workers, and other support personnel.
Key findings include the following: (1) basic computer information and keyboarding skills are necessary for workers on a daily basis; (2) IT training for front-line clerical workers has primarily been task-specific, but the training could be more effective if it included an overview of the systems used by the hospital and more generic IT information; (3) increased proficiency in using IT systems is not tied to advancement opportunities for front-line clerical workers; (4) increased use of IT does not significantly impact the recruitment or retention of clerical workers; and (5) increased use of IT has not reduced staff.
Many of these positions include heads-of-staff of clerical workers that are located in both academic and administrative units.
The entry grade scale for clerical workers in the airline starts at pounds 4.75 an hour.
Revisions were published for both the CPI-U and the Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers (CPI-W) for the U.S.
Before adjustment for seasonal change and deflation by the Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers (CPI-W), average hourly manufacturing wages were up from $13.60 in November 1998 to $14.06 (a 3.4% increase) in November 1999.
There were more than 60 million ordinary life policies in force in 1950, many requiring quarterly or semiannual premium notices--at a time when the industry faced recurrent shortages of clerical workers.
The adjustments are based on changes in the consumer price index for urban wage earners and clerical workers (CPI-W).