agent

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a·gent

(ā'jent),
1. An active force or substance capable of producing an effect. For agents not listed here, see the specific name.
2. In disease, a factor such as a microorganism, chemical substance, or a form of radiation, the presence or absence of which (as in deficiency diseases) results in disease or in more advanced form of disease.
[L. ago, pres. p. agens (agent-), to perform]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

Agent

AGENT
Angiogenic GENe Therapy. A clinical trial evaluating the safety & efficacy of an angiogenic gene therapy, Ad5-FGF4 (fibroblast growth factor 4).
Primary endpoint 1-month, 3-month exercise tolerance.
Conclusion Early data indicate that Ad5-FGF4 significantly improves exercise time in treated patients.

Agent
Choice in dying An adult appointed by the declarant, under an advance directive executed or made in accordance with the legal provisions, to make health care decisions for the declarant. VA Bd of Medicine, 1997-98 § 54.1-2982
Epidemiology A factor (such as a microorganism, chemical substance, or form of radiation) whose excessive presence, or relative absence (in deficiency states), is essential for the occurrence of a disease.
Health insurance An insurance company representative licensed by the state who solicits, negotiates, or effects insurance contracts and who provides services to the policyholder for the insurer.
Infomatics A small mobile piece of computer software that can send itself across a computer network and perform a task on a remote machine.
Medspeak A thing capable of producing an effect.
Military A code term for a biological substance that can be used as a weapon of mass destruction.
Nutrition A substance added to a food to change a physical property.
Pharmaceutical industry An authorised person who acts on behalf of or at the direction of a manufacturer, distributor, or dispenser, not including a common or contract carrier, public warehouseman, or employee of the carrier warehouseman. VA Bd of Pharmacy, 7/97.
Pharmacology Any substance capable of producing a physical, chemical or biologic effect.
Virology An unidentified virus or pathogen.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

agent

Clinical pharmacology An authorized person who acts on behalf of or at the direction of a manufacturer, distributor, or dispenser, which does not include a common or contract carrier, public warehouseman, or employee of the carrier warehouseman Choice in dying An adult appointed by the declarant under an advance directive, executed or made in accordance with the legal provisions, to make health care decisions for the declarant. See Declarant Epidemiology A factor, such as a microorganism, chemical substance, or form of radiation, whose excessive presence, or in deficiency diseases, relative absence, is essential for the occurrence of a disease Medtalk A thing capable of producing an effect. See Biological agent, Challenge agent, Controlled drug substance Scheduled agent, Cytoprotective agent, Cytotoxic agent, Dirty agent, Gene transfer agent, Intercalating agent, Nerve agent, Radiopaque contrast agent, Reducing agent, Reversal agent, Schedule I agent, Schedule II agent, Thrombolytic, Vesicant/blistering agent Pharmacology Any substance capable of producing a physical, chemical or biologic effect. See Alkylating agent, Antidiabetic agent, Antimitotic agent, Antineoplastic agent, Antiplatelet agent, Antipsychotic agent, Chemotherapeutic agent, Depolarizing agent, Inotropic agent, Keratolytic agent, Negative inotropic agent, Nondepolarizing agent, Positive inotropic agent Virology An unidentified virus or pathogen. See Creutzfeldt agent, Hawaii agent, Norwalk agent, Pittsburgh pneumonia agent, TORCH agent, TWAR agent.

AGENT

Cardiology A clinical trial–Angiogenic Gene Therapy
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

a·gent

(ā'jĕnt)
1. An active force or substance capable of producing an effect.
2. A factor such as a microorganism, chemical substance, or a form of radiation, the presence or absence of which (as in deficiency diseases) results in disease or more advanced disease.
[L. ago, pres. p. agens (agent-), to perform]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

a·gent

(ā'jĕnt)
1. An active force or substance capable of producing an effect.
2. In disease, a factor such as a microorganism, chemical substance, or a form of radiation, the presence or absence of which (as in deficiency diseases) results in disease or in more advanced form of disease.
[L. ago, pres. p. agens (agent-), to perform]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about agent

Q. Has anyone had an allergic reaction to gadolinium dye, MRI contrast agents, I have had a severe reaction. I would like to know the long term effects of this dye. And if anyone else has had or heard of problems and reactions to it. Please answer me. Thank you

A. In 1969 I almost died from the IVP dye. I had no idea I was allergic and when I awoke I was in a "recovery room." The doctor told me to always tell any physicians/paramedics etc of my allergy status regarding the dye. I now have chronic back pain, have a history of cancer in the family and the doctor wants to do a scan (including dye) but when I emphasized that I was allergic he backed off. Now I am wondering if there is anything else that can be done to test the bone (scan) without the dye. Any answers? Thanks

Q. Can anyone suggest a treatment for plantar fasciitis, apart from ultrasound, physio, anti-inflammatory agents? My friend has had Plantar Fasciitis for more than 1 year and has persevered with all the ususal treatments above plus lots of rest from weight-bearing and elevation.

A. Padded foot splints, silicone heels insert and special shoes (e.g. arch-supporting shoes) may also help. These are usually sold and fitted by a professional. Exercise is another important measure. Some patients benefit from avoiding walking barefoot or in sleepers but rather using shoes from the first step.

More advanced treatments include steroid-local anesthetics injections, botulinum toxin (similar to botox) injections and surgery.

The prognosis is usually favorable, and most patients achieve relief of the pain.

However, all of the above is just for general knowledge - if you have any specific question, you may want to consult a doctor.

You may read more here:
www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/007021.htm

More discussions about agent
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References in periodicals archive ?
It requested assistance for the qualification process, including cleaning agent recommendation and cleaning process operating parameters.
in the electronics industry, which requires good material compatibility and a non-corrosive cleaning agent.
During the process development trials using the initial 32 boards, the cleaning agent concentration, wash temperature and inline conveyor belt speed were varied and results recorded (TABLE 2).
* Less fluctuations in cleaning agent concentration leads to better cleaning stability.
With regard to the cleaning process, initial screening trials confirmed the pH neutral cleaning agent used at 10% concentration and 145[degrees]F wash temperature would be sufficient to clean the substrates.
The sheet is configured to be manually peeled apart in order to expose the cleaning agent so it can be adhered to the stained or soiled area of the fabric.
In this case, the process included an RMA flux system and micro phase technology cleaning agent. Wash bath makeup, or the addition of DI-water and concentrate, was manually completed based on the flowsensor concentration readings.
Maschinenbau Silberhorn GmbH in Parsberg, Germany, has designed a requirements oriented cleaning system for this purpose which is operated with an alkaline cleaning agent. The parts are inserted into workpiece carriers and pass through two cleaning baths at a temperature of 65[degrees]C.
In the 1960s, it replaced petroleum-derived compounds as the cleaning agent of choice.
* industrial washing machine and cleaning agent (90 [degrees] C);
The Purgaren cleaning agent from Rhein Chemie of W.
Within its current SMT process, this plant used an aqueous-based inline spray-in-air cleaning process and an alkaline cleaning agent. Although this process produced satisfactory results, material compatibility issues arose with one particular substrate that was manufactured with Pb-free solder paste and liquid flux.