Clean Water Act


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Clean Water Act

An act originally passed by the federal government in 1972, and since amended several times, that gives the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) responsibility for developing criteria for water-quality standards and controlling and regulating pollutants discharged into water sources.
References in periodicals archive ?
Professor Michael Blumm and Steven Thiel likewise criticize the Clean Water Rule for its categorical exclusion of groundwater, contending such an exclusion conflicts with the purposes, terms, and judicial interpretations of the Clean Water Act.
This is exactly the kind of scenario that the Clean Water Act is designed to prevent.
Reduces confusion about Clean Water Act protection;
The Clean Water Act aims to protect and restore water quality to levels sufficient to protect aquatic life and recreation, known as the "fishable and swimmable" goal.
Looking back, you have to agree the Clean Water Act has been one of the most successful environmental laws passed by Congress," said Ken Kirk, executive director of the National Association of Clean Water Agencies, which represents municipal sewage agencies and water treatment managers.
Without the bill, federal Clean Water Act fines would have gone straight to the US Treasury.
For example, the Clean Water Act authorizes EPA or a state to require a permit if discharges are detected from a former surface mine, and CERCLA may authorize EPA to respond to certain pollution from former surface mines.
The Clean Water Act protects the nation's waterways from industrial and municipal pollution, many sources of which were previously unregulated.
The report, entitled "Courting Disaster: How the Supreme Court Has Broken the Clean Water Act and Why Congress Must Fix It," was prepared by the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), Clean Water Action, Earthjustice, Environment America, the National Wildlife Federation, the Sierra Club, and the Southern Environmental Law Center.
3 in an effort to clarify the scope of Clean Water Act protection and which wetlands are subject to federal jurisdiction (and thus require a permit before development can occur).