boot

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boot

 [bo̳t]
an encasement for the foot; a protective casing or sheath.
Gibney boot an adhesive tape support used in treatment of sprains and other painful conditions of the ankle, the tape being applied in a basket-weave fashion with strips placed alternately under the sole of the foot and around the back of the leg.
Unna's paste boot a dressing for varicose ulcers, consisting of a paste made from gelatin, zinc oxide, and glycerin, which is applied to the entire leg, then covered with a spiral bandage, this in turn being given a coat of the paste; the process is repeated until satisfactory rigidity is attained.

boot

(būt),
A boot-shaped appliance.
[M.E. bote, fr. O.Fr.]
Computers verb To load an operating system—e.g., Windows— into the computer’s RAM or main memory, after which the computer can run applications
Drug slang verb A regional term meaning to inject a drug
Medspeak noun See Pellagrous boot
Orthopaedics noun Unna boot

boot

Informatics verb To load the operating system–eg, Windows, OS X into the computer's RAM or main memory, after which the computer can run applications. See Random access memory.

boot

(būt)
A shoe, brace, or restrictive bandage used to protect and immobilize the foot and ankle.
[M.E. bote, fr. O.Fr.]
References in periodicals archive ?
"These kids here still clean boots and in the winter they roll down the covers, take them off again and do manual labour around the club.
"No young kid will clean boots anymore like we did before but that's not to say we've not got good lads here.
But players don't clean boots any more and I'm a big advocate of that," he said.
They don't have to clean boots any more, they get a very easy life.
He would always be a reserve and always came home with spotlessly clean boots. That upset me because I could see it upset him," she said.
I can remember as a young player having to clean boots, carry the goals and do all the rotten jobs.
ANOTHER old Radford kid who wrote in to me recalls: "When my father was young in the 1890s he was employed to clean boots and do other odd jobs before school and often talked of the kindness he had received in the kitchen of Radford House.