Clean Air Act


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Clean Air Act

A federal law, enacted in 1956 and amended many times since then, that empowers the administration to protect the public health and welfare by defining and attempting to control atmospheric pollutants, including automotive and factory exhausts such as sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, particulates, and lead.
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As far as Section 21-D of the the Clean Air Act was concerned, Dimagiba said the DTI had complied through its part in the formulation and implementation of the NMVIMP through the setting of the Philippine National Standard for Tamper Resistance on Diesel Fuel Injection Pumps.
If the Clean Air Act doesn't explicitly mention greenhouse gas emissions, how can the EPA regulate them?
The Clean Air Act, which was signed into law by President Nixon in 1970, has not been subject to any major amendments since 1990, and Republicans, such as Rep.
The Justice Department said the criminal fines would be the largest ever in Louisiana for violations of the Clean Air Act. It also said Houston-based Pelican acknowledged that it had violated numerous standards in its permit -- including emissions of potentially deadly hydrogen sulfide -- and submitted false emissions reports to the Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality.
This time, Republicans and a handful of Democrats are targeting the federal Clean Air Act and the Environmental Protection Agency that is charged with enforcing the three-decade-old law.
Antipolo is a professional engineer and will work on Clean Air Act air dispersion modeling, compliance and permitting.
Treatment of greenhouse gases under the Clean Air Act.
Twenty years after the last major amendments the Clean Air Act, the United States has much to consider.
EPA states that undermining the Clean Air Act would risk vital new rules that could be used to raise fuel economy standards and reduce emissions from vehicles.
As a consequence, the agency "is now authorized and obligated to take reasonable efforts to reduce greenhouse pollutants under the Clean Air Act"
The Clean Air Act requires the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to establish national ambient air quality standards for six pollutants to protect public health and welfare.
In June 2008, a Fulton County judge ruled that Dynegy Energy's proposed plant should be regulated by the "best available control technology" emissions limit for any pollutant subject to regulation under the federal Clean Air Act. That judge cited the 2007 U.S.