clavicle

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Related to Clavicles: collarbone, Glutes

clavicle

 [klav´ĭ-k'l]
an elongated, slender, curved bone lying horizontally at the root of the neck, in the upper part of the thorax; called also collar bone. See anatomic Table of Bones in the Appendices. adj., adj clavic´ular.

clav·i·cle

(klav'i-kĕl), [TA] Avoid the misspelling clavical.
A doubly curved long bone that forms part of the shoulder girdle. Its medial end articulates with the manubrium sterni at the sternoclavicular joint, its lateral end with the acromion of the scapula at the acromioclavicular joint.
Synonym(s): clavicula [TA], collar bone

clavicle

/clav·i·cle/ (klav´ĭ-k'l) collar bone; a bone, curved like the letter f, that articulates with the sternum and scapula, forming the anterior portion of the shoulder girdle on either side.clavic´ular

clavicle

(klăv′ĭ-kəl)
n.
1. Either of two slender bones in humans that extend from the manubrium of the sternum to the acromion of the scapula. Also called collarbone.
2. One of the bones of the pectoral girdle in many vertebrates.

cla·vic′u·lar (klə-vĭk′yə-lər) adj.
cla·vic′u·late′ (-lāt′) adj.

clavicle

[klav′ikəl]
Etymology: L, clavicula, little key
a long curved, horizontal bone directly above the first rib, forming the ventral portion of the shoulder girdle. It articulates medially with the sternum and laterally with the acromion of the scapula and accommodates the attachment of numerous muscles. It is shorter, thinner, less curved, and smoother in the female than in the male and is thicker, more curved, and more prominently ridged for muscle attachment in persons performing consistent strenuous manual labor. Also called collarbone (informal).

clav·i·cle

(klav'i-kĕl) [TA]
A doubly curved long bone that forms part of the shoulder girdle. Its medial end articulates with the manubrium sterni at the sternoclavicular joint; its lateral end with the acromion of the scapula at the acromioclavicular joint.
Synonym(s): clavicula [TA] , collar bone.

clavicle

The collar-bone, which runs from the upper and outer corner of the breastbone (sternum) to connect to a process on the outer side of the shoulder-blade (scapula).
Clavicleclick for a larger image
Fig. 108 Clavicle . Location on left side of a primate.

clavicle

a bone associated with the ventral side of the shoulder girdle on each side of many vertebrates. In humans it is the collar bone.
Figure 1: The nervous system.

clavicle

the collar bone. Can be fractured in contact sports or with a fall on the outstretched arm. Figure 1.

clav·i·cle

(klav'i-kĕl) [TA]
A doubly curved long bone that forms part of the shoulder girdle.
Synonym(s): collar bone.

clavicle (klav´ikəl),

n a long, curved, horizontal bone just above the first rib, forming the ventral portion of the shoulder girdle. It articulates medially with the sternum and laterally with the scapula.

clavicle

the collar bone; reduced or absent from many domestic animals but present in animals that can grasp with their forelimbs such as the cat and primates. See also clavicular intersection.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chest roentgenogram revealed absent right clavicle with hypoplastic left clavicle and absent left 12[sup]th rib [Figure 2].
Typical radiographic imaging appearances are of multifocal synchronous or metachronous lytic or sclerotic or rarely mixed lytic-sclerotic lesions in metaphyses of long bones and the medial end of clavicle.
Chest radiograph (posteroanterior view) confirmed bilateral absence of clavicles (Fig 2).
Several studies have examined the safety and efficacy of primary open reduction and internal fixation for completely displaced fractures clavicle and noted high union rate with a low complication rate.
For teenagers' clavicles, between the ages of 12 and 18 years, articular cartilage had a decreased cellularity compared with previous age groups with an increasing fibrous matrix with what seem to be apoptotic cells and a clear ossification zone.
This study was designed to find out the anatomical variation in position, direction, and number of nutrient foramina in clavicles, as topographical knowledge of these foramina is useful in certain operative procedures to preserve the circulation.
Keywords: Clavicle, Condensing osteitis, Mechanical stress, Tooth.
The patient in this report had all the classical features of the syndrome; in addition, she had complete absence of both clavicles resulting in the classical ability of anterior approximation of both shoulders.
There is a mutation in CBF alpha 1(core binding factor); the affected molecule is a transcription factor, and the phenotype shows abnormal clavicles, wormian bones and supernumerary teeth.
Medially the clavicle is supported by strong capsular ligaments.
Another histologic difference is the existence in the clavicle of vascular canals that cross cartilage perpendicularly and connect with the erosion zone.
The most useful way to make the diagnosis was by comparing both clavicles and looking for a difference in one.