clavicle

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Related to Clavicles: collarbone, Glutes

clavicle

 [klav´ĭ-k'l]
an elongated, slender, curved bone lying horizontally at the root of the neck, in the upper part of the thorax; called also collar bone. See anatomic Table of Bones in the Appendices. adj., adj clavic´ular.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

clav·i·cle

(klav'i-kĕl), [TA] Avoid the misspelling clavical.
A doubly curved long bone that forms part of the shoulder girdle. Its medial end articulates with the manubrium sterni at the sternoclavicular joint, its lateral end with the acromion of the scapula at the acromioclavicular joint.
Synonym(s): clavicula [TA], collar bone
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

clavicle

(klăv′ĭ-kəl)
n.
1. Either of two slender bones in humans that extend from the manubrium of the sternum to the acromion of the scapula. Also called collarbone.
2. One of the bones of the pectoral girdle in many vertebrates.

cla·vic′u·lar (klə-vĭk′yə-lər) adj.
cla·vic′u·late′ (-lāt′) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

clav·i·cle

(klav'i-kĕl) [TA]
A doubly curved long bone that forms part of the shoulder girdle. Its medial end articulates with the manubrium sterni at the sternoclavicular joint; its lateral end with the acromion of the scapula at the acromioclavicular joint.
Synonym(s): clavicula [TA] , collar bone.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

clavicle

The collar-bone, which runs from the upper and outer corner of the breastbone (sternum) to connect to a process on the outer side of the shoulder-blade (scapula).
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
Clavicleclick for a larger image
Fig. 108 Clavicle . Location on left side of a primate.

clavicle

a bone associated with the ventral side of the shoulder girdle on each side of many vertebrates. In humans it is the collar bone.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

clav·i·cle

(klav'i-kĕl) [TA]
A doubly curved long bone that forms part of the shoulder girdle.
Synonym(s): collar bone.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Standard treatment for this fracture pattern is nonoperative, using an armsling or figure-of-eight bandage for external fixation.[4] Conservatively displaced fractures are noted to have a higher incidence of nonunion in between 10% and 15% and even when they do unite, often result in an unsightly cosmetic deformity in the center of the clavicle, shoulder dropping, shoulder discomfort, and patient dissatisfaction.[5],[6] The amount of pain and disability during the first 3 weeks of conservative treatment has been underrated.
In the 2nd century, AD, Galen of Pergamon transposed his observations made on monkeys onto humans and claimed that the cephalic vein (Galen's humeral vein) "arose" from the external jugular vein and encircling the clavicle "ran towards the periphery" [8].
Therefore, this hormone may also affect the long growth of female clavicles as reported in various populations including Isan Thais (Table IV).
The morphological parameters of the clavicle bone including total length, the diameters of three different regions, and the curvatures of the arched segment were measured according to the research of Andermahr et al.
Typical radiographic imaging appearances are of multifocal synchronous or metachronous lytic or sclerotic or rarely mixed lytic-sclerotic lesions in metaphyses of long bones and the medial end of clavicle. Other sites like shoulder girdle, spine, pelvis, and sacroiliac joints, the anterior chest, metatarsals, metacarpals, phalanges, tarsal bones, mandible have also been reported.
Chest radiograph (posteroanterior view) confirmed bilateral absence of clavicles (Fig 2).
Several studies have examined the safety and efficacy of primary open reduction and internal fixation for completely displaced fractures clavicle and noted high union rate with a low complication rate.
Conclusion: The knowledge of nutrient foramina in clavicles is important in surgical procedures such as bone grafting and in microsurgical vascularized bone transplantation.
Keywords: Clavicle, Condensing osteitis, Mechanical stress, Tooth.
The levels of bending stiffness of artificial clavicles fixed with tension band wiring, a Scorpion, and an LCP clavicle hook plate were 13.4 [+ or -] 2.8, 30.0 [+ or -] 4.7, and 37.0 [+ or -] 17.0 N/mm, respectively (Figure 4(a)).