taxonomy

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taxonomy

 [tak-son´ah-me]
the orderly classification of organisms or lists into appropriate categories (taxa), with application of suitable and correct names. adj., adj taxonom´ic.
numerical taxonomy a method of classifying organisms solely on the basis of the number of shared phenotypic characters, each character usually being given equal weight; used primarily in bacteriology.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

tax·on·o·my

(taks-on'ŏ-mē),
The systematic classification of living things or organisms. Kingdoms of living organisms are divided into groups (taxa) to show degrees of similarity or presumed evolutionary relationships, with the higher categories being larger, more inclusive, and more broadly defined, and the lower categories being more restricted, with fewer species more closely related. The divisions below kingdom are, in descending order: phylum, class, order, family, genus, species, and subspecies (variety). Infra- and supra- or sub- and super- categories can be used when needed; additional categories, such as tribe, section, level, group, etc., are also used.
[G. taxis, orderly arrangement, + nomos, law]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

taxonomy

(tăk-sŏn′ə-mē)
n. pl. taxono·mies
1. The classification and naming of organisms in an ordered system that is intended to indicate natural relationships, especially evolutionary relationships.
2. The science, laws, or principles of classification.
3. An ordered arrangement of groups or categories: a taxonomy of literary genres.

tax·on′o·mist n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

tax·on·o·my

(taks-on'ŏ-mē)
The systematic classification of living things or organisms. Kingdoms of living organisms are divided into groups (taxa) to show degrees of similarity or presumed evolutionary relationships, with the higher categories larger, more inclusive, and more broadly defined; the lower categories more restricted, with fewer species, and more closely related. The divisions below kingdom are, in descending order: phylum, class, order, family, genus, species, and subspecies (variety). Infra-, supra-, sub-, and super categories can be used when needed; additional categories, such as tribe, section, level, and group, are also used.
[G. taxis, orderly arrangement, + nomos, law]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

taxonomy

The science or principles of biological classification and the assignment of appropriate names to species.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

taxonomy

the study of the CLASSIFICATION of organisms. Classical taxonomy involves the use of morphological features, cytotaxonomy the use of somatic chromosomes, experimental taxonomy involves the determining of genetical interrelationships, and numerical taxonomy involves quantitative assessments of similarities and differences in an attempt to make objective assessments.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

tax·on·o·my

(taks-on'ŏ-mē)
The systematic classification of living things or organisms. Kingdoms of living organisms are divided into groups (taxa) to show degrees of similarity or presumed evolutionary relationships, with the higher categories larger, more inclusive, and more broadly defined; the lower categories more restricted, with fewer species, and more closely related. The divisions below kingdom are, in descending order: phylum, class, order, family, genus, species, and subspecies (variety).
[G. taxis, orderly arrangement, + nomos, law]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
These two examples show how Brown's ideas on combining topics and the need for a one-place system have been expanded and become more common in later classification theory and research.
BC2 is generally regarded as a system with a strong footing in the advances classification theory and practice have made during the twentieth century.
Nevertheless, the relatively brief analysis in this article shows the influence Brown's ideas and his idiosyncratic classification system have had on twentieth-century classification theory and research.
The view of objects based on classification theory is as direct representations of cognitive instances, having structural relational, and behavioral properties[9].
Ontology states that a thing is more than just its properties and that no two things have exactly the same properties; classification theory distinguishes the existence of an instance from its properties.
In her later work we see her demonstrating classification theory using three-dimensional visualizations (Williamson & Richmond, 1975).
It is the emphasis upon "relationships between concepts instead of strict hierarchical delineation of them" that, in her view, makes the Bliss Bibliographic Classification and Ranganathan's Colon Classification exemplars that pave the way for modern classification theory (Richmond, 1961, p.
However, it does not incorporate two premises of classification theory: (1) knowledge of instances precedes formation of concepts, and (2) concepts should be formed to support cognitive economy and inference.
In terms of classification theory, these possibilities reflect the fact that humans may gain knowledge of things that do not fit into an existing set of concepts.

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