Barton, Clara

(redirected from Clarissa Harlowe)
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Barton, Clara

(băr′tŏn)
U.S. nurse, 1821–1912. Founder of the American National Red Cross. She aided the wounded in the Civil War and was a contemporary of Florence Nightingale.
References in periodicals archive ?
Like Clarissa Harlowe, she wishes to exert her will over her body, bidding her own blood to flow when, just shortly before, the surgeons could extract only a few drops from her arm.
Clementina's physical body, like that of Clarissa Harlowe, represents much more than its own material substance: the woman's body is directly linked to a body of land.
Indeed, Richardson was not alone in his anxiety over the unruly bodies of young men and women, who, like Clarissa Harlowe, were increasingly determined to choose their future spouses based on compatibility and personal--and presumably--sexual attraction.
Cass's past and destiny are encoded and prescripted in her name, and the passage places her within Clarissa: The Clarissa for whom love is still "on the road but not yet at the gates" recalls a Clarissa Harlowe yet to be abducted and raped by Lovelace, yet to make her fatal rendezvous at the gates of her father's garden.
Richardson first presents the heroine, Clarissa Harlowe, when she is discovering the barely masked motives of her family, who want to force her into a loveless marriage to improve their fortunes.
Rousseau was greatly influenced by Clarissa Harlowe in his novel, Julie, ou La Nouvelle Heloise.
Clarissa Harlowe and Sir Charles Grandison (1753), whose hero is an ideal 18th-century gentleman, the male counterpart of Clarissa, are his two other major novels; all three are epistolary in form.
"The farm," at 66 Clara Barton Road in North Oxford, is where Clarissa Harlowe Barton was born on Christmas Day 1821.