isotretinoin

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isotretinoin

 [i″so-tret´ĭ-no-in]
a synthetic form of retinoic acid (13-cis-retinoic acid), used orally to clear cystic and conglobate acne.

i·so·tret·i·noin

(ī'sō-tret'i-noyn),
A retinoid used to treat severe recalcitrant cystic acne; a known human teratogen.

isotretinoin

(ī′sō-trĕt′n-oin′)
n.
A synthetic isomer of retinoic acid that inhibits sebaceous gland secretion and is used in the treatment of severe nodular acne. It can cause birth defects if taken during pregnancy.

isotretinoin

Retinoic acid, 13-cis retinoic acid A retinoid used to treat acne and psoriasis and may ↓ tumor development Side effects Inflammation of skin and mucosa, hepatitis

i·so·tret·i·no·in

(ī'sō-tret'i-nō'in)
A retinoid used to treat severe recalcitrant cystic acne; a known human teratogen.

isotretinoin

A RETINOID drug used to treat ACNE. The oral preparation is used under strictly controlled conditions to exclude pregnancy because of the known risks to the fetus. Brand names are Roaccutane, and, for external use Isotrex and Isotrexin.

Isotretinoin

A powerful vitamin A derivative used in the treatment of acne. It can promote scarring after skin resurfacing procedures.
Mentioned in: Acne, Skin Resurfacing

i·so·tret·i·no·in

(ī'sō-tret'i-nō'in)
A retinoid used to treat severe recalcitrant cystic acne; known human teratogen.
References in periodicals archive ?
picui; Null: Columbina squammata, Claravis pretiosa.
Similarly, unusually large numbers of the seedeater Sporophila schistacea and the dove Claravis pretiosa were attracted to seeding bamboo in 1994, but both species were rare in 1995 when markedly less bamboo was seeding.
A total of 19 pregnancies have been reported in patients on generic isotretinoin products since they became available, with 18 reported for Amnesteem (Bertek), one for Claravis (Barr), and none for Sotret (Ranbaxy).
Males of the New World genus Claravis are generally blue-gray in overall color whereas the females are mostly brown (Howell & Webb 1995).