bow

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bow

(),
Any device bent in a simple curve or semicircle and possessing flexibility.
[A.S. boga]

bow

(bo) an arched or curved appliance or device.

bow

()
Any device bent in a simple curve or semicircle and possessing flexibility.
[A.S. boga]
References in periodicals archive ?
It may seem a far cry from these Restoration figures to Elinor Glyn and Clara Bow, but Glyn's romantic infatuation with the Stuarts, her insights into what fiction sold (try her Three Weeks) and what Hollywood wanted, and Clara Bow's inborn gift of self-promotion gained them entree to Roach's list.
For example, in the 1927 Clara Bow movie mentioned earlier, the characters perceived the idea of an unwed mother as scandalous and shocking.
Bell was performing in "True to the Navy" in 1930 when he met Clara Bow, a movie star who defined the liberated woman of the 1920s.
In Candyfreak (Algonquin), Steve Almond reports that Americans once chomped candy bars honoring Charles Lindbergh (the Winning Lindy), Clara Bow (the It bar), and Al Smith (the Big-Hearted Al), as well as Dick Tracy, Amos 'n' Andy, airmail, the Pierce-Arrow, and the 18th Amendment.
Directed by William Wellman, a veteran of the Lafayette Escadrille and the Army Air Corps, and starring Richard Arlen, Buddy Rogers, and Clara Bow, with the young Gary Cooper in a supporting role, the most memorable aspect of the film is its stunning aerial combat scenes.
A movie geek references silent-screen star Clara Bow at a party to impress a girl, whom he then films getting date-raped minutes later.
Through persistents and a friendly reference, he started his film career as a camera assistant in Sam Wood's Paramount Studio unit, shooting silent films with Gloria Swanson, Rudolph Valentino and Clara Bow.
Clara Bow, sex goddess of silent film, created a sensation in the twenties with her generous lips, an early example that white glamour often owes much to black features--and vice versa.
DeMille premiered films starring Mary Pickford, Douglas Fairbanks, Rudolph Valentino, Gloria Swanson and Clara Bow in the majestic Paramount Theatre inside.
However the prized reading among us growing girls were the movie magazines with pictures of such glamorous stars like Clara Bow, Myrna Loy, and the sultry Pola Negri.
Another counterexample to Hinton's rosy view of the early college life film is brought out by the uninhibited Clara Bow in The Wild Party (1929).