Citrobacter diversus

Cit·ro·bac·ter di·ver·'sus

a bacterial species found in feces, soil, water, sewage, and food; isolated from urine, throat, nose, sputum, and wounds; reported in cases of neonatal meningitis where it frequently is severe, resulting in brain abscess formation.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

Citrobacter diversus

Microbiology A Citrobacter in soil, water, sewage and food, and an opportunistic pathogen Epidemiology C diversus is an important cause of bacterial meningitis, brain abscesses, and may cause endocarditis and hospital-acquired bacterial infections
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
coli was 38%, Pseudomonas aeruginosa 30% Klebsiella pneumonia 17%, Acinetobacter baumannii 12%, Citrobacter diversus 2%, Enterobacter agglomerans 1.4%13.
Moreover, in patients with HAEC observed some species of pathogenic microorganisms (P rettgeri, Citrobacter diversus, and others) with the indicators above the norm in the absence of these microorganisms in the group of patients without enterocolitis.
Of them Escherichia coli was 84% (11), Proteus 8% (1) and Citrobacter diversus 8% (1).
coli 43 28.5 Klebsiella pneumoniae 28 18.5 Klebsiella ozaenae 4 2.6 Enterobacter aerogenes 17 11.3 Citrobacter freundii 6 4.0 Citrobacter diversus 2 1.3 Proteus mirabilis 1 0.7 Providencia rettgeri 4 2.6 Total 151 100% Table 3: Percentage of in vitro antibacterial susceptibility pattern of Gram-positive bacteria isolates (n = 46).
The most frequent bacteria causing neonatal sepsis are Klebsiella pneuomoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae, Citrobacter diversus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus pyogenes and Staphylococcus aureus.5
coli isolates, 52 (40.94%) were multiple drug resistant bacteria, followed by Salmonella enterica isolates 17(34.00%), Citrobacter diversus 06 (35.29%), Proteus vulgaris 06 (50%).
(7.) Drelichman V, Band JD, Bacteremias due to Citrobacter diversus and Citrobacter freundii.
The identified bacterial community that was isolated from rice grains included: Acinetobacter haemolyticus, Acinetobacter junii, Klebsiella sibirica, Methylobacterium rhodesianum, Xanthobacter agilis, Burkholderia pseudomallai, Burkholderia glumae Citrobacter diversus, Kurthia oxytoca, Enterobacter asburiae, Acidovorax facilis and Acidovorax temperans.