circumlocution

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circumlocution

[-lōko̅o̅′shən]
the subconscious or learned use of pantomime, nonverbal communication, or word substitution by a patient because a word is difficult to retrieve or has been forgotten. See also anomia.

cir·cum·lo·cu·tion

(sĭr'kŭm-lō-kyū'shŭn)
Indirect, roundabout, wordy, or evasive speech, noted in Alzheimer disease and other dementias.
References in periodicals archive ?
We circle cliches and circumlocutions, showing students how such imprecision weakens their writing.
Instead, readers were treated to such complicated linguistic circumlocutions as: Bush's statements represented "embroidering key assertions" and were clearly "dubious, if not wrong.
Derrida's circumlocutions around the economy of differance in which he describes, so we might argue, a kind of "counter-economy" suspended between the "perfect return" and the "irreparable loss" of either the odyssean structure of economy or the expenditure of the gift might be of eminent constructive use.
His answer: Jerome, following Symmachus, deems the Hebrew word tsammah a biblical term for "vulva" -- hence, their euphemistic circumlocutions for the "shameful parts of a woman.
Spiffy witticisms go flat the fortieth time they're sprung on you, metaphors go stale, and circumlocutions grow mold.
Counterfeit communities pervade America today and are supported by what Freie calls "palaver," a new form of propaganda that provides us with "profusions of lofty ideas, circular reasoning, circumlocutions, babbling, and sometimes even .
Usually the discussion is confined to the past rather than the present for the simple reason that current circumlocutions must not be recognized as such if they are to be effective.
The author describes her essays as "examples of associative thinking; they are," she writes, "disjunctive assemblages utilizing strategies of analogy, metaphorical associations, and circumlocutions that juxtapose unexpected subjects in an attempt to make suggestive connections" (10).
Circumlocutions seem intended at times to avoid saying straight out that a situation of conflict exists.
That these circumlocutions were, in Cicero's mind, less ideal substitutes for a vocative is shown by the fact that they do not occur with the names of persons: `Atticum autem appellabat', `Brutum intuens', etc.
She has also done Demetrius the favour of substituting clear and austere language for Roberts' circumlocutions and occasional wordiness.
And as Bent (himself responsible for no fewer than six of the fifteen translations published here) points out in his series foreword, a complete translation today allows for none of the 'wholesale excisions, the coy circumlocutions, or the relegation of passages perceived as embarrassing and unpalatable to an appendix that have marred Schenker translations for so many decades' (p.