DNA

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Related to Circular DNA: covalently closed circular DNA

DNA

 
complementary DNA (cDNA) (copy DNA (cDNA)) synthetic DNA transcribed from a specific RNA through the reaction of the enzyme reverse transcriptase.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

DNA

Abbreviation for deoxyribonucleic acid. For terms bearing this abbreviation, see subentries under deoxyribonucleic acid.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

DNA

(dē′ĕn-ā′)
n.
A nucleic acid that carries the genetic information in cells and some viruses, consisting of two long chains of nucleotides twisted into a double helix and joined by hydrogen bonds between the complementary bases adenine and thymine or cytosine and guanine. DNA sequences are replicated by the cell prior to cell division and may include genes, intergenic spacers, and regions that bind to regulatory proteins.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

DNA

Abbreviation for:
deoxyribonucleic acid
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Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

DNA

Deoxyribonucleic acid Molecular biology A double-stranded linear macromolecule which encodes an organism's genetic information
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

DNA

Abbreviation for deoxyribonucleic acid.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

DNA

Abbrev. for deoxyribonucleic acid. The very long molecule that winds up to form a CHROMOSOME and that contains the complete code for the automatic construction of the body. The molecule has a double helix skeleton of alternating sugars (deoxyribose) and phosphates. Between the two helices, lying like rungs in a ladder, are a succession of linked pairs of the four bases adenine, thymine, guanine and cytosine. The molecules of adenine and guanine are larger than thymine and cytosine and so, to keep the rungs of equal length, adenine links only with thymine and guanine only with cytosine. This arrangement allows automatic replication of the molecule. The sequence of bases along the molecule, taken in groups of three (codons), is the genetic code. Each CODON specifies a particular amino acid to be selected, and the sequence of these, in the polypeptides formed, determines the nature of the protein (usually an ENZYME) synthesized. Polypeptide formation occurs indirectly by way of MESSENGER RNA and TRANSFER RNA. Periodicity of DNA is defined as the number of base pairs per turn of the double helix.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
DNAclick for a larger image
Fig. 137 DNA. Replication.
DNAclick for a larger image
Fig. 136 DNA. The ‘double helix’ shape produced by coiling.
DNAclick for a larger image
Fig. 135 DNA. Complementary base pairing.

DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid)

a complex NUCLEIC ACID molecule found in the chromosomes of almost all organisms, which acts as the primary genetical material, controlling the structure of proteins and hence influencing all enzyme-driven reactions.
  1. structure. DNA is a polymer of deoxyribonucleotides. The model proposed by WATSON and CRICK in 1953 has now become universally accepted for double-stranded DNA. The DNA is considered to consist of two POLYNUCLEOTIDE CHAINS joined together by hydrogen bonds between NUCLEOTIDE BASES, with COMPLEMENTARY BASE PAIRING between specific bases ensuring a parallel-sided, stable structure: ADENINE pairing with THYMINE (2H bonds) and CYTOSINE with GUANINE (3H bonds).

    The two polynucleotide chains each have an opposite polarity due to the way the phosphates are attached to the sugar groups by 3'- 5' PHOSPHODIESTER BONDS. DNA can exist in a number of configurations, of which B-DNA is the predominant form. In this form the molecule is twisted into a right-handed double helix, with a complete turn every tenth base.

    See also A-DNA, Z-DNA.

  2. replication (see SEMICONSERVATIVE REPLICATION MODEL). Replication is initiated at the ORIGIN OF REPLICATION. DNA HELICASE enzymes unwind the double-stranded DNA and each parental strand acts as a TEMPLATE for new DNA synthesis. The anti-parallel nature of the double-stranded DNA molecule affects the replication process. The DNA POLYMERASES involved in replication can only add NUCLEOTIDES to the 3'- OH group of a polynucleotide chain, that is, a DNA strand can only be synthesized in the 5'- 3' direction requiring a template running 3'-" 5'. Thus the two newly synthesized strands must grow in different directions. One daughter strand (the leading strand) is synthesized continuously in the 5'- 3' direction. The other daughter strand (the lagging strand) is synthesized discontinuously in fragments (called Okazaki fragments) that have been synthesized in the normal 5'- 3' direction, but the strand grows overall in the 3'-" 5' direction. These fragments are afterwards joined to make a continuous strand. The region in which replication occurs is called the replication fork. In E. coli, replication occurs as follows: the DNA unwinds, SSB protein is laid down on the single strands to stabilize them and to prevent rewinding. An RNA PRIMER initiates DNA synthesis on the leading strand. RNA primers initiate synthesis of each fragment on the lagging strand. These primers are later removed and the gaps left are filled in by the activity of a DNA polymerase. DNA LIGASE then joins the fragments together to form a complete strand.

    In eukaryotes, DNA replication occurs in the ‘S’ phase of the CELL CYCLE prior to nuclear division.

  3. location. DNA is found in all chromosomes except those of certain viruses (such as tobacco mosaic virus, TMV), where the heritable material is RNA. In PROKARYOTES, DNA is generally in the form of a single coiled molecule in a continuous loop (see NUCLEOID and may also occur as extrachromosomal material in the cytoplasm. In EUKARYOTES the DNA is also highly coiled but is complexed with basic and acidic proteins. There is probably only one very long DNA molecule per chromosome. DNA is also found in CHLOROPLASTS and MITOCHONDRIA of eukaryote cytoplasm (see CYTOPLASMIC INHERITANCE).
  4. DNA as a genetic material. There are several pieces of evidence to suggest the role of DNA in inheritance: (i) TRANSFORMATION experiments with Streptococcus (Diplococcus) pneumoniae in 1928, by F. GRIFFITH; (ii) the identification of the ‘transforming principle’ as DNA by AVERY MacLeod and McCarty in 1944; (iii) the fact that the wavelength of ultraviolet light which causes most mutations in various prokaryotes and eukaryotes matches the ABSORPTION SPECTRUM of nucleic acids (260 nm); (iv) HERSHEY and Chase's experiment with labelled BACTERIOPHAGE. DNA has several features which make it an ideal genetic material: great stability (see structure above); accurate replication so that all cells contain an identical copy of information; four nucleotide bases to provide storage of coded information (see GENETIC CODE); it is capable of mutation by altering the base sequence; it may be broken and rejoined to form new genetic combinations (see RECOMBINATION); stored information can be accurately ‘read’ by other cell molecules (see TRANSCRIPTION).
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid)

The abbreviation for "deoxyribonucleic acid," the primary carrier of genetic information found in the chromosomes of almost all organisms. The entwined double structure allows the chromosomes to be copied exactly during cell division.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid)

A type of nucleic acid that constitutes the molecular basis of heredity. It is found principally in the nucleus of all cells where it forms part of the chromosome, or in the cytoplasm of cells lacking a nucleus, such as bacteria. It acts as the carrier of genetic information containing the instructions (code) to make proteins. It consists of two single chains of nucleotides, which are twisted round each other to form a double helix or spiral. The nucleotides contain sugar (deoxyribose), phosphate and the bases (adenine, cytosine, guanine and thymine). The two strands of DNA are held together by hydrogen bonds located between specific pairs of bases (adenine to thymine and cytosine to guanine). The sequence of bases and consequently gene sequence is sometimes altered, causing mutation. Assessment of DNA has found many applications, including forensic science to help identify a perpetrator (a process called genetic fingerprinting), to establish family relationships or the history of a particular population (phylogenetics). See chromosome; gene; inheritance; mutation.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann

DNA

Abbreviation for deoxyribonucleic acid.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
(rc-DNA = relaxed circular DNA; HBV = hepatitis B virus; cccDNA = covalently closed circular DNA; pgRNA = pre-genomic RNA.)
[6] Nonstandard abbreviations: HCC, hepatocellular carcinoma; HBV, hepatitis B virus; rcDNA, relaxed circular DNA; cccDNA, covalently closed circular DNA; qPCR, quantitative real-time PCR; HBsAg, HBV surface antigen; FFPE, formalin-fixed paraffin- embedded; ddPCR, droplet digital PCR; HBsAb, HBV surface antibody; AFP, [alpha]- fetoprotein; TNM, tumor-nodes-metastasis; BCLC, Barcelona Clinic liver cancer; 5-mC, 5- methylcytosine; 5-hmC, 5-hydroxymethylcytosine.
It allows to cut DNA molecules representing elements of a PDA after ligating of transition molecules to both sides of circular DNA. It avoids problems that appeared in Cavaliere et al.
Its endonuclease nature was clear from its degradation of covalently closed circular DNA (Figure 3B).
The researchers then transferred the circular DNA into the blood cells, where the introduced genes turned on to convert the blood cells to iPS cells within 14 days.
The intrahepatic HBV DNA includes cccDNA and other forms of HBV DNA such as single-stranded DNA, double-stranded linear DNA, and relaxed circular DNA. Because it was reported that there was a correlation between the level of intrahepatic HBV DNA and cccDNA (13), the reduction of intrahepatic HBV DNA in this study might also demonstrate a reduction of cccDNA.
It is also believed to decrease ccc DNA (covalently closed circular DNA, which is a template DNA for viral replication) in the liver cells.
TTV and Torque Teno Minivirus (TTMV) have been recently classified into a new floating genus called Anellovirus (Biagini et al., 2005).TTV is a non-enveloped, single-stranded, circular DNA virus with a genomic length of 3.4-3.9 kb (Nishizawa et al.; Miyata et al., 1999; Mushahwar et al., 1999).
When the linking number is reduced in closed circular DNA, the molecule supercoils by minimizing twisting and bending.
They describe DNA super-coiling, including its quantitative measure and the geometrical properties of closed- circular DNA, the behavior of DNA on surfaces, knots and catenanes, DNA topoisomerases, and the biological consequences of DAN topology, including genome organization, replication, control of gene expression, transcription, and recombination.
Following the method of Lund and Aust (1992; Carcinogenesis 13:637-642), we used supercoiled circular DNA from bacteriophage fX 174 as the target substrate in a highly sensitive assay to evaluate ROS-dependent damage from insoluble forms of nickel in comparison to similarly treated ROFA.
Comprising its own circular DNA, the mitochondrial genome of metazoans typically encodes 2 rRNAs, 22 tRNAs, and 12 to 13 polypeptides.