ciprofloxacin

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ciprofloxacin

 [sip″ro-flok´sah-sin]
a quinolone antibacterial agent effective against many gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, including some strains resistant to other agents such as penicillins.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ciprofloxacin

(sĭp′rō-flŏk′sə-sĭn)
n.
A semisynthetic analog of fluoroquinolone that is administered orally and has a broad spectrum of antibiotic activity.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

ciprofloxacin

Cipro® Antibiotics A broad-spectrum–GNRs, staphylococci, fluoroquinolone with limited activity against streptococci, anaerobes Indications Acute sinusitis, acute exacerbation of chronic bronchitis, UTI, acute cystitis in ♀, bacterial prostatitis, intra-abdominal infection, skin, bone and joint infection, infectious diarrhea, typhoid fever, gonorrhea Adverse effects GI pain, N&V, diarrhea, seizures, rash, photosensitivity. See Fluoroquinolone.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ciprofloxacin

A fluoroquinolone antibiotic used to treat urinary infections and, as eye drops, for the treatment of corneal ulcers. The drug acts by binding to the enzyme gyrase. Mutations lead to an alteration in the structure of this enzyme leading to antibiotic resistance. Current research suggests the possibility of preventing this process. The drug is on the WHO official list. Brand names are Ciproxin and Ciloxan.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

antibiotic 

1. Pertaining to the ability to destroy or inhibit other living organisms.
2. A substance derived from a mould or bacterium, or produced synthetically, that destroys (bactericidal) or inhibits the growth (bacteriostatic) of other microorganisms and is thus used to treat infections. Some substances have a narrow spectrum of activity whereas others act against a wide range of both gram-positive and gram-negative organisms (broad-spectrum antibiotics). Antibiotics can be classified into several groups according to their mode of action on or within bacteria: (1) Drugs inhibiting bacterial cell wall synthesis, such as bacitracin, vancomycin and the β-lactams based agents (e.g. penicillin, cephalosporins (e.g. ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, cefuroxime). (2) Drugs affecting the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane, such as polymyxin B sulfate and gramicidin. (3) Drugs inhibiting bacterial protein synthesis, such as aminoglycosides (e.g. amikacin sulfate, framycetin sulfate, gentamicin, neomycin sulfate and tobramycin), tetracyclines, macrolides (e.g. erythromycin and azithromycin) and chloramphenicol. (4) Drugs inhibiting the intermediate metabolism of bacteria, such as sulfonamides (e.g. sulfacetamide sodium) and trimethoprim. (5) Drugs inhibiting bacterial DNA synthesis, such as nalixidic acid and fluoroquinolones (e.g. ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, norfloxacin and ofloxacin). (6) Other antibiotics such as fusidic acid, the diamidines, such as propamidine isethionate and dibrompropamidine. Syn. antibacterial. See antiinflammatory drug; fusidic acid.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann