cassia

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Related to Cinnamomum cassia: berberine, Cinnamomum verum

cassia

(kăsh′ə)
n.
1. Any of various chiefly tropical or subtropical trees, shrubs, or herbs of the genus Cassia in the pea family, having pinnately compound leaves, usually yellow flowers, and long, flat or cylindrical pods.
2.
a. A tropical evergreen tree (Cinnamomum aromaticum syn. C. cassia) of East and Southeast Asia, having aromatic inner bark.
b. The bark of this tree, often ground and used as a spice. It is the chief source of cinnamon in the United States.

Cinnamon cassia

Chinese medicine
A tree native to southeast Asia which has analgesic, astringent and diaphoretic principles. In Chinese herbal medicine, the bark and twigs are used for different indications: cinnamon bark is used for anorexia, abdominal pain, asthmatic wheezing, diarrhoea, fatigue, impotence, infertility, loss of libido and urinary frequency; cinnamon twigs are used for arthritis, colds, fibroids, low-grade fever and painful menses. Both may be use in Raynaud phenomenon, to improve vision and as a cardiovascular tonic.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lima, "Atividade Antifungica e Alteracoes Morfolagicas Induzidas pelo (Oleo Essencial de Cinnamomum cassia frente Cepas de Candida albicans Isoladas de Pacientes HIV Positivos," Pesqui Bras Odontopediatria Clin Integr, vol.
Shu et al., "Diterpenoids with immunosuppressive activities from Cinnamomum cassia," Journal of Natural Products, vol.
Yang et al., "The ability of an ethanol extract of Cinnamomum cassia to inhibit Src and spleen tyrosine kinase activity contributes to its anti-inflammatory action," Journal of Ethnopharmacology, vol.
Insecticidal and fumigant activities of Cinnamomum cassia bark-derived materials against Mechoris ursulus (Coleoptera: Attelabidae).
Besides salt and pepper, cinnamon is the best-known and most commonly used spice in American kitchens, but ironically, it is usually cassia (Cinnamomum cassia) and not true cinnamon that most Americans consume.
Kogure et al., "Extract prepared from the bark of Cinnamomum cassia blume prevents glutamate-induced neuronal death in cultured cerebellar granule cells," Phytotherapy Research, vol.
The diabetic mice were randomly assigned to three therapy groups and orally administered with different prescription proportions of Rhizoma Coptidis and Cinnamomum cassia respectively.
Bruns: "I found Hydrastis canadensis, Curcuma longa and Cinnamomum cassia extracts to be the most potent.
Hence there is no strong evidence to confirm that these reported biological activities are from authenticated Ceylon cinnamon (true cinnamon) since the genus contains four economically important cinnamon species such as Cinnamomum zeylanicum or CAnnamomum verum (Ceylon cinnamon or true cinnamon), CAnnamomum aromaticum (Cinnamomum cassia or Chinese cinnamon), Cinnamomum burmannii (Korintje, Java, or Indonesian cinnamon), and Cinnamomum loureiroi (Vietnamese or Saigon cinnamon) [28].
The results showed that two of the three samples from Cinnamomum cassia were rich in B-type procyanidin oligomers, and the other sample was rich in A-type procyanidin oligomers.
Cinnamon (Cinnamomum cassia) bark is widely used by traditional and modern herbalists for its anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antimicrobial and antidiabetic effects.