Cinderella cancer

Cinderella cancer

A UK term of dubious utility for:
(1) A cancer that is a low priority for national funding, e.g., lung cancer or multiple myeloma, or
(2) A cancer that supposedly is not widely discussed, e.g., rectal cancer.
References in periodicals archive ?
This Cinderella cancer, which currently affects around 6,700 UK women a year, still has a rather depressingly - and unnecessarily - low survival rate, mainly because of its low profile.
A little while ago, I set out the history of the charity's first 15 years in my book 'Cinderella Cancer'.
Money raised from the Light up a Life appeal will help defeat lung cancer, known as the Cinderella cancer.
Professor Garth Cruickshank, professor of neurosurgery at Birmingham University, claimed brain tumours had been "the Cinderella cancer" for too long.
"Despite this brain tumours have been the Cinderella cancer for too long, although it has more impact on people's lives in terms of days lost than any other cancer.
Funding for the Cinderella cancer support services must increase, broadcaster and journalist Jonathan Dimbleby has urged.
"In the past, the disease has been so low-profile - it's a Cinderella cancer - but the Roy Castle Foundation will improve my job and the jobs of others like me."
Money raised from the Light up a Life appeal will help defeat lung cancer, which is known as the Cinderella cancer.
Professor Ray Donnelly signed copies of his autobiographical work, Cinderella Cancer: A Personal History of the Roy Castle Lung Foundation, at the Old Hall Street atrium in Liverpool.
Jennifer Dickson, patient network manager for the foundation, said the disease was a "Cinderella cancer" because it received little cash despite affecting more than 40,000 people each year.