chylomicron

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chylomicron

 [ki″lo-mi´kron]
a particle of the class of lipoproteins responsible for the transport of exogenous cholesterol and triglycerides from the small intestine to tissues after meals. Chylomicrons are spherical particles with a core of triglycerides surrounded by a layer of phospholipids, cholesterol, and apolipoproteins.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

chy·lo·mi·cron

, pl.

chy·lo·mi·cra

,

chy·lo·mi·crons

(kī'lō-mī'kron, -mī'kră, -mi'kronz),
A large lipid droplet (up to 100 mm in diameter) of reprocessed lipid synthesized in epithelial cells of the small intestine and containing triacylglycerols, cholesterol esters, and several apolipoproteins (for example, A-I, B-48, C-I, C-II, C-III, E); the least dense (less than 1.006 g/mL) of the plasma lipoproteins that function as transport vehicles.
[chylo- + G. micros, small]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

chylomicron

(kī′lō-mī′krŏn′)
n.
A lipoprotein formed in the small intestine that transports dietary fats and cholesterol through the lymphatic system to the bloodstream. Chylomicrons are larger and less dense than very-low-density lipoproteins.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

chy·lo·mi·cron

, pl. chylomicra, pl.chylomicrons (kī'lō-mī'kron, -kră,-kronz)
A droplet of reprocessed lipid synthesized in epithelial cells of the small intestine; the least dense of the plasma lipoproteins.
[chylo- + G. micros, small]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

chylomicron

the form in which fat is transported from the gut to the rest of the body, consisting of a lipid core surrounded by an envelope of protein, cholesterol and phospholipid. Chylomicrons are around 100 nm across and are formed in the intestinal mucosa, from where they enter the LACTEALS and eventually the bloodstream.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005