chronograph

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chronograph

 [kron´o-graf]
an instrument for recording small intervals of time.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

chro·no·graph

(kron'ō-graf),
An instrument for graphic measurement and recording brief time periods.
[chrono- + G. graphō, to record]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
31 For two reasons: how common this story is in the Periegesis is irrelevant to the question of whether the chronographer included the story in his account; the fact that part of the same story is found in Theopompus does not automatically identify him as the source.
For the years 258-314, from the `Chronographer of 354' (with, in brackets, the consular years expressed in modern terms and, in italics, additions from the other lists preserved by the Chronographer):
In the summer of 311 it would have made more sense to Eusebius as a chronographer (not to mention as a Christian) to follow the regnal years of Constantius and Constantine (who were non-persecutors) right from the death of Diocletian, and this is what I think happened.
None of the chronographers' citations from the diverse literature of the Hellenistic period reflects first-hand knowledge of these sources; thus paraphrases of a work like Jubilees are freely combined with citations from other sources.
Hellanicus, for example, was content merely to note that certain heroes lived a number of generations apart, without being too specific.(85) It is unlikely that he left behind a complete list of the priestesses of Hera accompanied by dates; otherwise, later Hellenistic chronographers would have preserved such a valuable list, just as they recorded the list of Spartan kings which was known to Herodotus (7.204).(86) The archaioi sungrapheis certainly did alter heroic genealogies so as to synchronize heroes from different mythical families.(87) But we would be mistaken to assume that this particular activity was their sole purpose for producing their works.
In these studies there is a trajectory from the spiritual to the literal, as ineffably learned theologians and chronographers succumbed to the irresistible temptation of the new mathematics.
Nowhere is this more true than in regard to Semonides, whose very name was not even known correctly.(3) The earlier the period, the less precise the information available to the chronographers and their Alexandrian sources, and the greater their tendency to conjecture dates based on comparison with the few historical figures or events whose dates could be determined.