fluorosis

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Related to Chronic Fluoride Poisoning: sodium fluoride poisoning

fluorosis

 [floo͡″ro´sis]
a condition due to ingestion of excessive amounts of fluorine or its compounds; see fluoride poisoning.
chronic endemic fluorosis that due to unusually high concentrations of fluoride, usually in the natural drinking water supply, typically causing dental fluorosis characterized by a mottled appearance of the teeth. Combined osteosclerosis and osteomalacia can also occur in occupational exposures to vapors and dust.
dental fluorosis hypoplasia of the dental enamel resulting from prolonged ingestion of drinking water containing high levels of fluoride, manifested by the condition called mottled enamel.
skeletal fluorosis skeletal changes due to long term ingestion of excessive fluoride; they may include hyperostosis, osteopetrosis, and osteoporosis.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

fluor·o·sis

(flōr-ō'sis),
1. A condition caused by an excessive intake of fluorides (2 or more ppm in drinking water), characterized mainly by mottling, staining, or hypoplasia of the enamel of the teeth, although the skeletal bones are also affected.
2. Chronic poisoning of livestock with fluorides that blacken and soften developing teeth and reduce bones to a chalky brittleness; most often caused by ingestion of forage contaminants near large aluminum plants.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

fluorosis

(flo͝o-rō′sĭs, flô-, flō-)
n.
An abnormal condition caused by excessive intake of fluorine, as from fluoridated drinking water, characterized chiefly by mottling of the teeth.

fluo·rot′ic (-rŏt′ĭk) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
A chronic low-level intoxication that occurs where drinking water has fluoride concentrations above 2 ppm
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

fluorosis

Chronic fluoride poisoning Toxicology A chronic low-level intoxication that occurs where drinking water has fluoride > 2 ppm Clinical Weight loss, brittle bones, anemia, weakness, ill health, stiffness of joints, mottled enamel and chalky white discolored teeth with a normal resistance to caries; fluorosis is common, given flouride's availability in mouth rinses, toothpastes, misuse of fluoride treatments. See Fluoride, Fluoride poisoning, Fluoride treatment, Fluorine.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

fluor·o·sis

(flōr-ō'sis)
A condition caused by an excessive intake of fluorides, characterized mainly by mottling, staining, or hypoplasia of the enamel of the teeth.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

fluorosis

Poisoning with repeated large doses of the element fluorine. This may affect aluminium ore (bauxite) miners and workers involved in insecticide and phosphate fertilizer manufacture. The calcium in the bones is gradually replaced by fluorine and the bones become soft and crumbly. Abnormal bone protrusions occur and these may cause trouble, especially in the spine, where they may press on the spinal cord or nerve roots.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

fluor·o·sis

(flōr-ō'sis)
Condition caused by an excessive fluoride intake (2 or more ppm in drinking water), characterized by mottling, staining, or hypoplasia of the tooth enamel.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about fluorosis

Q. How do you differentiate between fluorosis and caries? Both appear as white spots on the teeth, so clinically how do you differentiate between them? I know it has something to do with their appearance while wet and dry, but I am not sure what? please help me I can't find this in any book.

A. Only mild fluorosis is seen as white stop lesion on the tooth. It usually comes with brown spots. Look for them. Another method is trying to stick a dental explorer into it (not the Microsoft one- it’ll only be a portal for viruses..) and because caries is demineralized area it will feel kind of sticky. But I wouldn’t do that…it can harm the teeth. Another way is by an x ray. Fluorosis- you will see it as a whiter spot. Caries- a more translucent spot.

More discussions about fluorosis
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