karyotype

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Related to Chromosome morphology: Karyogram

karyotype

 [kar´e-o-tīp]
the chromosomal constitution of the cell nucleus; by extension, the photomicrograph of chromosomes arranged. See also illustration at chromosome.
Preparation of a karyotype. From Mueller and Young, 2001.

kar·y·o·type

(kar'ē-ō-tīp),
The chromosome characteristics of an individual cell or of a cell line arranged in descending order of size and according to the position of the centromere. Usually presented as a systematized array of metaphase chromosomes from a photomicrograph of a single cell nucleus.
Synonym(s): idiogram (1) , karyogram
[karyo- + G. typos, model]

karyotype

/karyo·type/ (-tīp″) the chromosomal constitution of the cell nucleus; by extension, the photomicrograph of chromosomes arranged according to the Denver classification.

karyotype

(kăr′ē-ə-tīp′)
n.
1. The characterization of the chromosomal complement of an individual or a species, including number, form, and size of the chromosomes.
2. A photomicrograph of chromosomes arranged according to a standard classification.
tr.v. karyo·typed, karyo·typing, karyo·types
To classify and array (the chromosome complement of an organism or a species) according to the arrangement, number, size, shape, or other characteristics of the chromosomes.

kar′y·o·typ′ic (-tĭp′ĭk), kar′y·o·typ′i·cal adj.

karyotype

[ker′ē·ətīp′]
Etymology: Gk, karyon + typos, mark
1 the number, form, size, and arrangement within the nucleus of the somatic chromosomes of an individual or species, as determined by a microphotograph taken during metaphase of mitosis.
2 a diagrammatic representation of the chromosome complement of an individual or species, in which the chromosomes are arranged in pairs in descending order of size and according to the position of the centromere. See also chromosome, Denver classification, idiogram. karyotypic, adj.
enlarge picture
Normal male karyotype

kar·y·o·type

(kar'ē-ō-tīp)
The chromosome characteristics of an individual cell or of a cell line, usually presented as a systematized array of metaphase chromosomes from a photomicrograph of a single cell nucleus arranged in pairs in descending order of size and according to the position of the centromere.
Synonym(s): idiogram (1) .
[karyo- + G. typos, model]

karyotype

1. The individual chromosomal complement of a person or species. The genome.
2. The CHROMOSOMES of an individual set out in a standard pattern and obtained from a photomicrograph taken in METAPHASE that has been edited with software so that the separate chromosomes are arranged in numerical order. This is done for the diagnosis of chromosomal disorders, as in prenatal detection of fetal abnormality.

karyotype

the CHROMOSOME complement of a cell or organism, characterized by the number, size and configuration of the chromosomes as seen during metaphase of MITOSIS.

Karyotype

A standard arrangement of photographic or computer-generated images of chromosome pairs from a cell in ascending numerical order, from largest to smallest.

kar·y·o·type

(kar'ē-ō-tīp)
The chromosome characteristics of an individual cell or of a cell line, usually presented as a systematized array of metaphase chromosomes from a photomicrograph of a single cell nucleus arranged in pairs in descending order of size and according to the position of the centromere.
Synonym(s): idiogram (1) .
[karyo- + G. typos, model]

karyotype

(ker´ēōtīp)
n the chromosomal arrangement of a single cell. The schematic representation of an individual's chromosomes, arranged in pairs according to number, form, and size.

karyotype

the chromosomal constitution of the cell nucleus; by extension, the photomicrograph of chromosomes arranged in numerical order.
References in periodicals archive ?
Despite some inconsistency in NF values - probably attributable to uncertainty in determining precise chromosome morphology and the possibility of arms being added by NOR translocations - the correlated changes in M and T frequencies are typical of a fusion or fission series.
The chromosome morphology was shown to be constant in the different Atta species, unlike the observations made for the species of Acromyrmex (Barros 2010; Cristiano et al.
Both chromosomes have heterochromatin on the centromere of this homeologous chromosome pair, while duplication of a portion of the centromeric heterochromatin may have modified the chromosome morphology.
The differences noted in chromosome morphology and heterochromatin distribution patterns revealed by a comparison of the Atta species assessed in the present study with Ac.
2006), the diploid number varies from 2n = 7 to 2n = 37, the predominant chromosome morphology is also metacentric, and the SDCS may be of the X (43%), [X.
The few cytogenetically studied species of Pholcidae and other haplogyne families exhibit karyotypic peculiarities, such as predominantly metacentric chromosome morphology and X/XX sex determination chromosome system, that contrasts with those of Entelegynae.
The diploid number, chromosome morphology, SDCS type, and behavior of chromosomes during meiosis were determined with conventional staining, and the distribution pattern of the active nucleolar organizer regions (NORs) in the chromosomes was established using silver staining.
However, combining C-banding and chromosome morphology made it possible to develop karyotypes that are more informative than previous karyotypes of B.
In this sense, the difference found in our data could be largely derived from the continuous changes of chromosome morphology produced during the cell cycle.
We have described here a fluorescent imaging method for analyzing chromosome morphology and especially chromosomal DNA contents.
Repetitive sequences: cause for variation in genome size and chromosome morphology in the genus Oryza.
Not all seven of the chromosome groups could be clearly identified in these accessions due to a general lack of chromosome-specific banding patterns and relatively uniform chromosome morphology.