mosaicism

(redirected from Chromosomal mosaicism)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

mosaicism

 [mo-za´ĭ-sizm]
the presence in an individual of cells derived from the same zygote, but differing in chromosomal constitution.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

mo·sa·i·cism

(mō-zā'i-sizm), [MIM*158250]
Condition of being mosaic (2).
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

mosaicism

(mō-zā′ĭ-sĭz′əm)
n.
A condition in which tissues of genetically different types occur in the same organism.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

mosaicism

The phenotype of a multicelled organism, which is composed of cells expressing different genotypes; for instance, women are functionally mosaic due to the X chromosome genes expressed. Mosaicism due to mutation is less common.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

mo·sa·i·cism

(mō-zā'i-sizm)
Condition of being mosaic (2).
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

mosaicism

The state in which two or more genetically different types of cell occur in the same individual. Although the cells are all derived from the same fertilized egg, they do not all possess the same number of chromosomes. In about 1% of cases of DOWN'S SYNDROME there are two different cell lines, one normal and the other with an additional chromosome 21 (trisomy 21). The effect of mosaicism varies with the proportion of cells containing abnormal chromosomes. Compare CHIMERA.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Mosaicism

A genetic condition resulting from a mutation, crossing over, or nondisjunction of chromosomes during cell division, causing a variation in the number of chromosomes in the cells.
Mentioned in: Patau Syndrome
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chromosomal mosaicism indicates that a normal cell line is present and that the abnormal cell line probably developed after fertilization took place.
Chromosomal mosaicism throughout human preimplantation development in vitro: incidence, type, and relevance to embryo outcome.
Chromosomal mosaicism, in which only some cells show a particular abnormality, may or may not be more readily detected by array-CGH than by standard techniques.
University of Florida researchers find that about 1.5 percent of embryos may be implanted with undetected genetic disorders because of a rare condition called chromosomal mosaicism. (8)
There could be some reasons for lack of demonstration of chromosomal mosaicism in all individuals with HI[10]: (1) most cytogenetic studies have been directed so far at peripheral lymphocytes or at cultured fibroblasts obtained from skin biopsies rather than at cultured keratinocytes or melanocytes (lines of Blaschko are epidermal not dermal), and (2) some genetic mosaicisms are too subtle to be detected by current techniques.
Despite the development and effectiveness of new techniques and their ability to identify the maximum euploid embryos, a limited number of embryos is reported with chromosomal mosaicism due to using just 5-10 cells for genetic assessment (2).