Chromobacterium


Also found in: Encyclopedia.

Chromobacterium

 [kro″mo-bak-tēr´e-um]
a genus of gram-negative, aerobic or facultatively anaerobic, usually nonpathogenic rod-shaped bacteria; C. viola´ceum may cause abscesses, diarrhea, and urinary tract and systemic infections.

Chromobacterium

(krō'mō-bak-tēr'ē-ŭm),
A genus of bacteria containing gram-negative, motile rods. These microorganisms produce a violet pigment (violacein) and are occasionally pathogenic to humans and animals. The type species is Chromobacterium violaceum.
References in periodicals archive ?
The natural antimicrobial carvacrol inhibits quorum sensing in Chromobacterium violaceum and reduces bacterial biofilm formation at sub-lethal concentrations.
cepacia1 -- AAA50466.1 Vibrio cholerae 12129(1) EEN99655 Rhodoferax ferrireducens T118 WP_011465630.1 Myxococcus xanthus -- WP_011555480.1 Chromobacterium violaceum ATCC12472 NP_902384.1 C.
Chromobacterium violaceum is a Gram-negative, facultative anaerobe, motile, oxidase and catalase positive bacilli which produce a purple pigment violacein which is alcohol-soluble, water and chloroform insoluble.
Bacterial strains used in the present investigation were Chromobacterium violaceum ATCC 12472, Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1, Serratia marcescens ATCC 13880, and Listeria monocytogenes (laboratory strain).
The wide spread of Chromobacterium throughout a variety of environments, such as soil, water, and plant from tropical and subtropical regions, is due to its considerable metabolic flexibility [12-16].
Gilboa-Garber, "Preventing Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Chromobacterium violaceum infections by anti-adhesion-active components of edible seeds," Nutrition Journal, vol.
Additionally, Brucella spp., Neisseria spp., and Chromobacterium spp.
Chromobacterium violaceum is ubiquitously present in the environment of tropical and subtropical regions [1].
Torres, "Characterization of Chromobacterium violaceum pigment through a hyperspectral imaging system," AMB Express, vol.
Moreover, it has shown to inhibit the biofilms formation by Chromobacterium violaceum, Typhimurium DT104, Salmonella enterica, and Staphylococcus aureus [41].
Evaluation of anti-quorum-sensing activity of edible plants and fruits through inhibition of the N-acyl-homoserine lactone system in Chromobacterium violaceum and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.