chromatophore

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chromatophore

 [kro-mat´o-for]
any pigmentary cell or color-producing plastid.

chro·mat·o·phore

(krō-mat'ō-fōr),
1. A colored plastid, due to the presence of chlorophyll or other pigments, found in certain forms of protozoa.
2. Melanophage; a pigment-bearing phagocyte found chiefly in the skin, mucous membrane, and choroid coat of the eye, and also in melanomas.
3. Synonym(s): chromophore
4. A colored plastid in plants, for example, chloroplasts, leukoplasts, etc.
[chromato- + G. phoros, bearing]

chromatophore

/chro·mato·phore/ (-for) any pigmentary cell or color-producing plastid.

chromatophore

(krō-măt′ə-fôr′)
n.
1. Any of several types of pigment cells, especially one found in a fish, amphibian, or reptile.
2. A multicellular organ in cephalopods that contains pigment cells.
3. A specialized pigment-bearing organelle in certain photosynthetic bacteria.

chro·mat·o·phore

(krō-mat'ō-fōr)
1. A plastid, colored because of the presence of chlorophyll or other pigments, found in certain forms of protozoa.
2. Melanophage; a pigment-bearing phagocyte found chiefly in the skin, mucous membrane, and choroid coat of the eye, and also in melanomas.
3. Synonym(s): chromophore.
4. A colored plastid in plants (e.g., chloroplasts, leukoplasts).
[chromato- + G. phoros, bearing]

chromatophore

A pigment-containing cell.

chromatophore

  1. (also called chromoplast) a pigmented PLASTID of plant cells which may be green due to the presence of chlorophyll or differently coloured because of the presence of CAROTENOID pigments. CHROMATOPHORES are often CHLOROPLASTS in which the pigment has broken down, as in the ripening of fruit.
  2. (in animals) a cell with pigment in the cytoplasm which can be dispersed or concentrated so changing the colour of the animal as a whole. Animals with this characteristic include frogs, chameleons, cephalopods.
  3. (in photosynthetic bacteria and CYANOBACTERIA) a membranous structure carrying photosynthetic pigments.

chromatophore

any pigmentary cell or color-producing plastid.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dendritic chromatophores appeared in the tegument of the optic vesicles and the cardiac region.
On the matrinxa, dendritic chromatophores were clearly observed on the cranial region and yolk sac 36 h AF; then, there was total retinal pigmentation 38 h AF.
Blue king crab undergo a diapause stage that lasts for approximately 2 months (Stevens, 2006) between the stages of chromatophore formation and eye enlargement (approximately equivalent to our stages 9 and 10).
Other than that, discoloration, which is one of the indicative damage may be caused by impairment of pituitary function reflected by reduction in number and size of chromatophores and their pigment content [2].
White or blue light prompts the pale skin's tiny quick-change color organs, or chromatophores, to expand, creating waves of yellows and browns.
The mood swing signals pigment-containing cells in the skin called chromatophores to produce changes in skin color.
Color changes in teleosts are due to the aggregation/dispersion of pigment within the light-absorbing chromatophores, in particular to the motile activity of melanosomes, and to the reflecting changes in active iridophores (Beeching 1995, Fujii et al.
Coloration in reptiles, as in other poikilothermic vertebrates, is determined by chromatophores (BECHTEL, 1995).
1990) attributed the secretion of mucus over the body and dispigmentation to dysfunction of the endocrine gland under toxic stress causing changes in the number and area of mucus glands and chromatophores.
The researchers discovered this gene, for a protein called opsin, concentrated near chromatophores - tiny organs that consist of an elastic sac of red, yellow or black pigment tied to muscle fibres.