chromatid

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Related to Chromatids: Sister chromatids

chromatid

 [kro´mah-tid]
either of two parallel filaments joined at the centromere that make up a chromosome and that divide in cell division, each going to a different pole of the dividing cell and each becoming a chromosome of one of the two daughter cells.

chro·ma·tid

(krō'mă-tid),
Each of the two strands formed by longitudinal duplication of a chromosome that becomes visible during prophase of mitosis or meiosis; the two chromatids are joined by the still undivided centromere; after the centromere has divided at metaphase and the two chromatids have separated, each chromatid becomes a chromosome.
[G. chrōma, color, + -id (2),]

chromatid

(krō′mə-tĭd)
n.
Either of the two daughter strands of a replicated chromosome that are joined by a single centromere and separate during cell division to become individual chromosomes.

chro·ma·tid

(krō'mă-tid)
Each of the two strands formed by longitudinal duplication of a chromosome that becomes visible during prophase of mitosis or meiosis; the two chromatids are joined by the still undivided centromere; after the centromere has divided at metaphase and the two chromatids have separated, each chromatid becomes a chromosome.
[G. chrōma, color, + -id (2),]

chromatid

One of the two duplicated copies of a chromosome produced by replication while still connected at the CENTROMERE before separation at the subsequent cell division. Each chromatid becomes a new chromosome.
Chromatidclick for a larger image
Fig. 102 Chromatid . (a) Before duplication. (b) After duplication.

chromatid

one of a pair of duplicated CHROMOSOMES produced during the ‘S’ phase of the CELL CYCLE, which are joined together at the CENTROMERE. See Fig. 102 . During nuclear division the centromere splits (in anaphase of mitosis, anaphase 2 of MEIOSIS) to produce two separate chromosomes.
References in periodicals archive ?
Canovas et al., "Atypically low spontaneous sister chromatid exchange formation in uveal melanoma," Genes, Chromosomes and Cancer, vol.
A recently published paper noted that embryo derived from reciprocal aneuploid oocyte (untimely sister chromatid division during meiosis I, revealed after polar body biopsy) resulted in the birth of a healthy child after correct chromatid segregation during meiosis II [33].
sister chromatids carrying the recessive allele to be transmitted to the
Moreover, tea drinking has recently proven to be associated with cell-mediated immune function of the human body (Wu et al., 2012) and protects against hepatitis C virus entry (Calland et al., 2012).Earlier studies of the antimutagenic activity of green tea were to be effective in reduction chromosomal aberrations (CAs), micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes, sister chromatid exchange (SCEs), gene forward mutation induced by various chemicals in both in vitro and in vivo system (Bhattacharya& Girl, 2012; Ito et al., 1989; Wang et al., 1989; Imanishi et al., 1991).
REC8 is retained around the centromere until the start of anaphase II [59] ensuring that sister chromatids do not become prematurely separated.
For instance, the sister chromatids do not separate at the anaphase stage of mitosis in the case of mutants that fail to undergo cleavage of cohesion (Hodges et al., 2005); similarly, chromosomes do not separate at anaphase of meiosis I in some mutants with abnormalities of both formation and distribution of the synaptonemal complex (Tsubouchi et al., 2006).
Meiosis in holocentric chromosomes: kinetic activity is randomly restricted to the chromatid ends of sex univalents in Graphosoma italicum (Heteroptera).
2004), and of the recombinase RAD51, which has a role in DOA strand exchange between homologous chromatids (Shinohara et al.
In addition, we found that, although sister chromatids enter meiosis in very close proximity to one another, Pds5 acts to inhibit synapsis between them, a good thing because, then, meiotic conditions support the necessary pairing of homologs," he added.
Chromosome Stickiness and Clumping: Grant (1978) suggested that chromosome stickiness a rises from improper folding of the chromosome fiber into single chromatids and chromosomes.
In addition, the chromosomes replicate such that each chromosome consists of two identical chromatids joined at the centromere.
As the chromosomes reach this most condensed and shortest condition, these double strands become visible as two chromatids connected by a noncondensed area called the centromere.