naevus

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ne·vus

, pl. nevi (nē'vŭs, -vī)
1. A circumscribed malformation of the skin, especially one that is colored by hyperpigmentation or increased vascularity; a nevus may be predominantly epidermal, adnexal, melanocytic, vascular, or mesodermal, or a compound overgrowth of these tissues.
2. A benign localized overgrowth of melanin-forming cells of the skin at birth or appearing early in life.
Synonym(s): mole (1) , naevus.
[L. naevus, mole, birthmark]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

naevus

Any coloured growth or mark on the skin present at birth. A birthmark. From Latin naevus , a spot or blemish.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

naevus

  1. any birthmark, usually a sharply defined reddish patch on the skin.
  2. a pigmented mole on the skin.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

naevus

Any localized area of pigmentation or vascularization of the skin or eye tissues, usually benign and congenital. Note: also spelt nevus. Plural: naevi.
choroidal naevus A benign accumulation of melanocytes in the choroid. It affects some 10% of the population. Ophthalmoscopically it appears as a slate-grey lesion, flat or minimally elevated, oval or circular. It is asymptomatic. With time drusen may also appear. See melanocyte; choroidal melanoma.
conjunctival naevus A naevus located on the conjunctiva, most often near the limbus. It appears as a yellowish-red area or deeply pigmented mass usually before the age of 20. A pigmented conjunctival naevus must be distinguished from an acquired melanoma of the conjunctiva which occurs later in life (after the third decade, is typically unilateral and may become malignant). A conjunctival naevus rarely becomes malignant. It can be excised if cosmetically undesirable or has enlarged to such a degree as to irritate the eye.
flammeus naevus See Sturge- Weber syndrome.
iris naevus A pigmented spot of variable size on the surface of the iris. It is composed of an accumulation of melanocytes in the iris stroma. It is usually benign but occasionally it may transform itself into a malignant melanoma. See melanocyte; iris melanoma; ICE syndrome.
naevus of Ota A benign, congenital, usually unilateral, accumulation of melanocytes on the cheek, eyelids, forehead, nose or sclera. Some naevi may become malignant melanoma. Syn. oculocutaneous melanosis; oculodermal melanocytosis. See ocular melanocytosis; melanosis.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann

ne·vus

, pl. nevi (nē'vŭs, -vī)
Circumscribed dermal malformation, especially if hyperpigmented or with increased vascularity; may be predominantly epidermal, adnexal, melanocytic, vascular, or mesodermal, or a composite.
Synonym(s): naevus
[L. naevus, mole, birthmark]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Burnier Jr., "Immunohistochemical expression of S-100[beta] in choroidal melanomas," Canadian Journal of Ophthalmology, vol.
Only 1 in 500 choroidal nevi will evolve into a choroidal melanoma and the risk factors predictive of small melanocytic lesions developing into melanoma have been described.
Conventional karyotyping was performed on cell cultures of 50 choroidal melanomas and was unsuccessful in 4 tumors; 1 failure could be attributed to a technical problem.
Choroidal melanoma is the most common primary malignant intraocular tumour, accounting for 80% of all melanomas of the uveal tract.
Choroidal melanoma, by contrast, produces an (often marked) elevation of She retina.
Peripheral choroidal melanoma tends to present with a visual field defect or a localised flickering light corresponding to the location of the mass.
Which of the following is NOT a clinical risk factor for choroidal melanoma?
The image displays malignant choroidal melanoma, which is the most common primary intraocular tumour in adults
Worldwide licensing agreement with Aura Biosciences for the use of Clearside's SCS Microinjector to deliver Aura's proprietary drug candidates into the suprachoroidal space for the potential treatment of certain ocular cancers, including choroidal melanoma.
Clearside Biomedical announced its entry into a worldwide licensing agreement with Aura Biosciences for the use of Clearside's Suprachoroidal Space Microinjectorto deliver Aura's proprietary drug candidates into the SCS for the potential treatment of certain ocular cancers, including choroidal melanoma. Aura is developing a novel class of therapies, viral nanoparticle conjugates, designed to selectively bind and eliminate cancer cells without damaging surrounding normal tissues.
- US-based Aura Biosciences, a specialist in the development of novel targeted therapies in ocular oncology, will present interim clinical data from its Phase 1b/2 clinical trial evaluating the safety and efficacy of light-activated AU-011, the company's lead product candidate for the primary treatment of primary choroidal melanoma, in an oral presentation at the International Society of Ocular Oncology 2019 annual meeting being held next week, the company said.