Chopart amputation


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Related to Chopart amputation: Lisfranc amputation

Cho·part am·pu·ta·tion

(shō-pahr'),
amputation through the midtarsal joint; that is, between the tarsal navicular and the calcaneocuboid joints.

Cho·part am·pu·ta·tion

(shō-pahr' amp'yū-tā'shŭn)
Amputation through the midtarsal joint; i.e., between the tarsal navicular and the calcaneocuboid joints.
Synonym(s): mediotarsal amputation.

Chopart amputation

Disarticulation at the midtarsal joint.

Chopart,

François, French surgeon, 1743-1795.
Chopart amputation - amputation through the midtarsal joint. Synonym(s): mediotarsal amputation
Chopart ankle dislocation
Chopart articulation
Chopart brace
Chopart fracture
Chopart joint - the synovial joints which act as a unit in allowing the front of the foot to pivot relative to the back of the foot about the longitudinal axis of the foot. Synonym(s): transverse tarsal joint
Chopart osseous joint injury
Chopart partial foot prosthesis
References in periodicals archive ?
The power generated by the subjects with TMT and Lisfranc amputation was virtually negligible and comparable to that exhibited on the affected limbs of the subjects with Chopart amputation (Figure 12(b)-(c)).
Three distinct movement patterns were observed, and on this basis, the "Discussion" will be presented in discrete sections looking at the gait of (1) the single subject with MTP amputation who used insoles, (2) the subjects with TMT and Lisfranc amputation as a group who wore toe fillers and slipper sockets, and (3) the subjects with Chopart amputation who used clamshell prostheses.
Interestingly, the devices provided to these subjects with amputation were designed to allow ankle motion, but these subjects did not generate any more power across the ankle joint (Figure 12(b)) than the subjects with Chopart amputation who wore clamshell devices designed to eliminate ankle motion (Figure 12(b)-(c)).
As a result of the clamshell devices fitted to the subjects with Chopart amputation, in whom ankle motion was eliminated, progression to foot flat during loading response was delayed as the shank and foot segments moved synchronously.