choline

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choline

 [ko´lēn]
an amine that occurs in phosphatidylcholine and acetylcholine, and is an important methyl donor in intermediary metabolism. Choline is a lipotropic agent, a substance that decreases liver fat content by increasing phospholipid turnover. It was formerly considered to be a B vitamin and is now classified as a pseudovitamin, although it is still sometimes classified as part of the vitamin B complex. Vitamin B12 and folacin are involved in the synthesis of choline.
choline acetylase (choline acetyltransferase) an enzyme that brings about the synthesis of acetylcholine.
choline magnesium trisalicylate see under trisalicylate.
choline salicylate see salicylate.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

cho·line

(kō'lēn),
agent found in most animal tissues either free or in combination as lecithin (phosphatidylcholine), acetate (acetylcholine), or cytidine diphosphate (cytidine diphosphocholine). It is included in the vitamin B complex. Several salts of choline are used in medicine.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

choline

(kō′lēn′)
n.
A natural amine, C5H15NO2, often classed in the vitamin B complex, that is a constituent of lecithin and other phospholipids and is a precursor of certain biologically important molecules, such as acetylcholine.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

choline

A chemical present in most tissues, either free or combined with acetate (acetylcholine, which is critical for synaptic transmission), cytidine diphosphate or lecithin (phosphatidylcholine); it is included in the vitamin B complex.

Alternative medicine
Some providers of alternative healthcare have recommended choline to manage body odour, convulsions and tardive dyskinesia.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

cho·line

(kō'lēn)
An amine found in most animal tissues. It is included in the vitamin B complex; as acetylcholine, it is essential for synaptic transmission. Several salts of choline are used in medicine.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

choline

One of the B vitamins necessary for the metabolism of fats and the protection of the liver against fatty deposition. The important NEUROTRANSMITTER acetylcholine is formed from it.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

choline

an organic base which is a constituent of ACETYLCHOLINE.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

cho·line

(kō'lēn)
Agent found in most animal tissues either free or in combination as lecithin, acetate, or cytidine diphosphate; included in vitamin B complex.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
However, no specific experiments have been conducted to evaluate the problems of choline deficiency in broiler chickens, viz., growth retardation, worsening of FCR and fatty liver.
This linear decline in weight gain, feed efficiency and increase in RLW to increasing levels of SBM replacement with SPI as a protein source in diets suggests that choline deficiency was experimentally induced in a dose-dependent manner, which in-turn negatively influenced the production parameters of broiler chickens.
Based on the results from experiment 1, 25% replacement of SBM by SPI was selected for further screening of PHF in comparison with SCC as it yielded an optimum negative impact on BWG and FCR through optimum induction of choline deficiency in broilers.
In conclusion, choline deficiency could cause growth depression and perosis of starter Pekin ducks.
Today, few people exhibit overt choline deficiency. Zeisel suspects, however, that at least some teeter on the brink of insufficiency.
The signs of choline deficiency including growth retardation, poor survival, poor feed efficiency (FE) and increased liver lipid concentration have been reported in carp (Cyprinus carpio) (Ogino et al., 1970), lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) (Ketola, 1976), rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) (Rumsey, 1991), hybrid striped bass (More saxatilisxMorone chryso) (Griffin et al., 1994), red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) (Craig and Gatlin, 1996), yellow perch (Perca flavescens) (Twibell and Brown, 2000), channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) (Zhang and Wilson, 1999), hybrid tilapia (Oreochromis niloticusxO.
The AMP is one of the choline antagonists which have been demonstrated to slow down the choline biosynthesis through the inhibition of S-adenosyl-methionine-dependent methylation and results in choline deficiency symptoms.
Considering the fact that fatty acids are structural components of phospholipid and neutral lipid molecules which undergo altered metabolism during choline deficiency, we examined the fatty acid composition of fish liver in order to gain further insight as to the lipotropic action of choline.
However, the fad might have become popularized because of a pervasive choline deficiency in our population.
However, a recent study from Penn State University found that among a group of 57 men and women, 19% required as much as 825 milligrams a day to prevent the development of fatty liver, one of the side effects of a choline deficiency. Men and postmenopausal women in the study were more likely to suffer choline-deficiency symptoms than were younger women.
Background: Severe choline deficiency can lead to liver dysfunction (including fatty liver) and muscle abnormalities.