choline

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choline

 [ko´lēn]
an amine that occurs in phosphatidylcholine and acetylcholine, and is an important methyl donor in intermediary metabolism. Choline is a lipotropic agent, a substance that decreases liver fat content by increasing phospholipid turnover. It was formerly considered to be a B vitamin and is now classified as a pseudovitamin, although it is still sometimes classified as part of the vitamin B complex. Vitamin B12 and folacin are involved in the synthesis of choline.
choline acetylase (choline acetyltransferase) an enzyme that brings about the synthesis of acetylcholine.
choline magnesium trisalicylate see under trisalicylate.
choline salicylate see salicylate.

cho·line

(kō'lēn),
agent found in most animal tissues either free or in combination as lecithin (phosphatidylcholine), acetate (acetylcholine), or cytidine diphosphate (cytidine diphosphocholine). It is included in the vitamin B complex. Several salts of choline are used in medicine.

choline

/cho·line/ (ko´lēn) a quaternary amine, often classified as a member of the B vitamin complex; it occurs in phosphatidylcholine and acetylcholine, is an important methyl donor in intermediary metabolism, and prevents the deposition of fat in the liver.
choline magnesium trisalicylate  see under trisalicylate.
choline salicylate  see salicylate.

choline

(kō′lēn′)
n.
A natural amine, C5H15NO2, often classed in the vitamin B complex, that is a constituent of lecithin and other phospholipids and is a precursor of certain biologically important molecules, such as acetylcholine.

choline

[kō′lēn]
Etymology: Gk, chole, bile
a lipotropic substance that can be synthesized by the body. Under certain circumstances it is considered by some to be essential. Found in most animal tissues, choline is a primary component of acetylcholine, the neurotransmitter, and functions with inositol as a basic constituent of lecithin. It prevents fat deposits in the liver and facilitates the movement of fats into the cells. The richest sources of choline are liver, kidneys, brains, wheat germ, brewer's yeast, and egg yolk. See also inositol, lecithin.

choline

A chemical present in most tissues, either free or combined with acetate (acetylcholine, which is critical for synaptic transmission), cytidine diphosphate or lecithin (phosphatidylcholine); it is included in the vitamin B complex.

Alternative medicine
Some providers of alternative healthcare have recommended choline to manage body odour, convulsions and tardive dyskinesia.

cho·line

(kō'lēn)
An amine found in most animal tissues. It is included in the vitamin B complex; as acetylcholine, it is essential for synaptic transmission. Several salts of choline are used in medicine.

choline

One of the B vitamins necessary for the metabolism of fats and the protection of the liver against fatty deposition. The important NEUROTRANSMITTER acetylcholine is formed from it.

choline

an organic base which is a constituent of ACETYLCHOLINE.

choline,

n a compound that is used by the body to synthesize acetylcholine (a neurotransmitter), lecithin (phosphatidylcholine), and platelet-activating factor (a blood clotting agent). Choline can be obtained from dietary sources as a supplement and is also synthesized by the body. Has been used for nerve conditions, kidney conditions, liver conditions, headaches, dizziness, and fatigue. Taking regular doses of more than 3.5 g per day can produce a fishy odor, low blood pressure, diarrhea, dizziness, and changes in the ECG. See also lecithin.

cho·line

(kō'lēn)
Agent found in most animal tissues either free or in combination as lecithin, acetate, or cytidine diphosphate; included in vitamin B complex.

choline

a quaternary amine which occurs in the phospholipid phosphatidylcholine and the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, and is an important methyl donor in intermediary metabolism. It was formerly considered to be a B-vitamin and was used to treat fatty degeneration of the liver.

choline acetylase, choline acetyltransferase
an enzyme that brings about the synthesis of acetylcholine.
choline esters
choline has some of the activity of a cholineric drug but the effect is multiplied many times over by combining it with an acid, e.g. acetic acid, to form an ester, e.g. acetylcholine. Other choline esters with important pharmacological activity are carbachol, bethanechol, methacholine.
choline nutritional deficiency
requirements for choline are largely dependent on the amount of methionine in the diet. In dogs and cats, under normal circumstances, deficiency is unlikely, but choline is a dietary essential for pigs and young calves. Incoordination, weakness, dyspnea and hock swelling occur in experimental deficiency, but there is little evidence of naturally occurring disease. Poultry fed diets deficient in choline develop perosis.
choline salicylate
the choline salt of salicylic acid, which has analgesic, antipyretic and anti-inflammatory properties.
choline theophyllinate
a theophylline derivative used as a bronchodilator. Called also oxtriphylline.
References in periodicals archive ?
The AMP is one of the choline antagonists which have been demonstrated to slow down the choline biosynthesis through the inhibition of S-adenosyl-methionine-dependent methylation and results in choline deficiency symptoms.
Considering the fact that fatty acids are structural components of phospholipid and neutral lipid molecules which undergo altered metabolism during choline deficiency, we examined the fatty acid composition of fish liver in order to gain further insight as to the lipotropic action of choline.
Their results showed that choline deficiency results in diminution of Th2/Th1 response which can lead to reduced host response to antigens.
This suggests, they said, that severe choline deficiency in adulthood may impair memory reversibly.
Today, few people exhibit overt choline deficiency.
With this method, the effects of folate deficiency (6), chronic choline deficiency (7), alcohol intake (8), and choline deficiency and methotrexate treatment (5) on folate form distribution in several tissues in rats have been examined.
Effects of choline deficiency and methotrexate treatment upon liver folate content and distribution.
Background: Severe choline deficiency can lead to liver dysfunction (including fatty liver) and muscle abnormalities.
However, a recent study from Penn State University found that among a group of 57 men and women, 19% required as much as 825 milligrams a day to prevent the development of fatty liver, one of the side effects of a choline deficiency.