vinyl chloride

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Related to Chloroethylene: Chloroethene, Vinyl Chloride Monomer

vi·nyl chlo·ride

a substance used in the plastics industry and suspected of being a potent carcinogen in humans.
Synonym(s): chloroethylene
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

vinyl chloride

 Toxicology A monomer that polymerizes to polyvinyl chloride–PVC, which is used in organic chemistry and manufacturing plastics Adverse effects VC is carcinogenic and carries a risk of liver, brain, lung CA, lymphoma, leukemia. See PVC–polyvinyl chloride.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

vinyl chloride

CH2=CHCl, a vinyl radical attached to a chlorine atom. It is used commercially to make pipes, tubing, and plastic resin. Some people exposed to vinyl chloride develop hepatic angiosarcoma.
CAS # 75-01-4
See also: vinyl
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
1983), a reductive tripeptide, which inactivates both the VCM hepatotoxic metabolites chloroethylene oxide and chloracetaldehyde.
Theoretical examples of positive interactions include a) induction of P450 2E1 by ethanol and nicotine, which leads to an increased rate of metabolism of certain chemicals (e.g., vinyl chloride) to DNA-reactive intermediates (e.g., chloroethylene oxide) (Ghissassi et al.
Chloroethylene mixtures: pharmacokinetic modeling and in vitro metabolism of vinyl chloride, trichloroethylene, and trans-1,2-dichloroethylene in rat.
First, the form of the metric (total daily metabolism divided by the volume of the liver) was consistent with the mode of action for the end point of concern (liver tumors), which involves DNA adduct formation by a highly reactive chloroethylene epoxide produced from the metabolism of vinyl chloride.
VC has been found as a degradation product of chloroethylene solvents (perchloroethylene and trichloroethylene) and in landfill gas and groundwater at concentrations up to 200 mg/[m.sup.3] and 10 mg/L, respectively.