chlorinated

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chlorinated

 [klor´ĭ-nāt″ed]
charged with chlorine.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

chlo·ri·nat·ed

(klōr'in-āt-ĕd),
Having been treated with chlorine.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

chlo·ri·nat·ed

(klōr'in-āt-ĕd)
Having been treated with chlorine.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about chlorinated

Q. Are throat nodulars caused by second hand smoke, allergy drip, and reflux. Also can chlorine and rust in water

A. Throat nodules, or also known as - vocal cord nodules, are usually caused by maximum contact between the two vocal cords. The cause of these formations are usually strenuous or abusive voice practices such as yelling and coughing. Persons who are often susceptible are those who use their voice constantly in a loud environment. Examples include teachers, cheerleaders, politicians, actors, musicians and singers. I am not sure I understand the question about chlorine and rust in water, I don't think these factors have a connection to vocal cord nodules. Other throat nodules can be cause by smoking (not as much in second hand smoke), alcohol or chewed tobbacco use.

More discussions about chlorinated
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References in periodicals archive ?
They include oily sludge and contaminants dangerous to inhale or touch: perchloroethylene, trichloroethylene and chlorinated hydrocarbons, to name a few.
Chemical analysis of the products revealed that the highest concentration of chlorinated hydrocarbon was detected in Street's Picrin, which was confirmed to contain almost 100% TCE.
Finally, to identify any organic compounds that have survived, we have to deal with oxychlorine compounds and possibly other strong oxidants in the sample which will react with and combust organic compounds to carbon dioxide and chlorinated hydrocarbons when the samples are heated by SAM."
Previous research showed that the chemical degradation of chlorinated hydrocarbons also progressed with a stepwise dehalogenation mechanism [1].
The author notes six factors that have contributed to these improvements: advances in pesticide chemistry and toxicology, the banning of many chlorinated hydrocarbons, the development of new biochemical targets, increased reliance on genetically modified crops that has reduced the amount and variety of pesticides applied, an emphasis on biodegradability and environmental protection, and integrated pest-and pesticide-management systems.
Like many chlorinated hydrocarbons, tetrachloroethene is a central nervous system depressant and can enter the body through the skin, or by inhalation.
Among the topics are spatial and temporal trends of polybrominated diphenyl ethers, the environmental contamination status of polychlorinated biphenyls in China, chlorinated hydrocarbons in animal tissues and products of animal origin from Poland, contamination profiles and temporal trends of POC in oysters from the Gulf of Mexico, and the contamination profile and temporal trends of persistent organic pollutants in Antarctic biota.
These include chlorinated hydrocarbons, aromatic oils, naphthenic oils, alkylether monoesters and epoxidized esters, to name a few.
EPA reports soil and groundwater at the site are contaminated with high concentrations of tetrachloroethene (PCE), trichloroethene (TCE), other chlorinated hydrocarbons and freons.
In regulating trichoroethylene and other chlorinated hydrocarbons, the EPA assumed that animal data are predictive for humans and also extrapolated from a high dose to the much smaller doses in most situations, and tried to regulate at a risk level on 1:1 million in a lifetime, or about 1:70 million per year, pessimistically calculated.
According to Larry Pinto, author of Techletter.com, increased worldwide travel and the rising popularity of secondhand goods may be factors in the resurgence of bed bugs, but the most likely reason is our rejection of DDT and other harsh insecticides composed of chlorinated hydrocarbons.
According to Larry Pinto, author of The Techletter, a leading information source for the pest control industry, increased worldwide travel and the rising popularity of second-hand goods may be factors in the resurgence of bed bugs, but the most likely reason is our rejection of DDT and other harsh insecticides composed of chlorinated hydrocarbons.