Chlamydiaceae

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Chlamydiaceae

 [klah-mid″e-a´se-e]
a family of bacteria containing a single genus, Chlamydia.

Chla·myd·i·a·ce·ae

(kla-mid'ē-ā'sē-ē),
A family of the order Chlamydiales (formerly included in the order Rickettsiales) that includes the agents of the psittacosis-lymphogranuloma-trachoma group. The family contains small, coccoid, gram-negative bacteria that resemble rickettsiae but that differ from them significantly by possessing a unique, obligately intracellular developmental cycle; intracytoplasmic microcolonies give rise to infectious forms by division. The classification of these organisms previously was in a state of flux, but they are now placed in a single genus, Chlamydia, the type genus of the family.

Chlamydiaceae

/Chla·myd·i·a·ceae/ (klah-mid″e-a´se-e) a family of bacteria (order Chlamydiales) consisting of small coccoid microorganisms that have a unique, obligately intracellular developmental cycle and are incapable of synthesizing ATP. They induce their own phagocytosis by host cells, in which they then form intracytoplasmic colonies. They are parasites of birds and mammals (including humans). The family contains a single genus, Chlamydia.

Chla·myd·i·a·ce·ae

(klă-mid'ē-ā'shē-ē)
A family of the order Chlamydiales (formerly included in the order Rickettsiales) that includes the agents of the psittacosis-lymphogranuloma-trachoma group. The family contains small, coccoid, gram-negative bacteria that resemble rickettsiae but differ from them by possessing a unique, obligately intracellular developmental cycle. Intracytoplasmic microcolonies give rise to infectious forms by division.

Chlamydiaceae

a family of obligately intracellular gram-negative bacterial pathogens that parasitize the host cell for ATP. Outside the host cell they exist as elementary bodies, which are 200-300 nm in diameter, have a rigid cell wall and adhere to host cells and are phagocytosed. Inside the host cell phagosome, they form larger reticulate bodies, which replicate, then form elementary bodies, which are released by cell lysis. Cultivable in cell cultures and the yolk sacs of chick embryos. Contains two genera, Chlamydia and Chlamydophila.