Chlamydia pneumoniae

Chla·myd·i·a pneu·mo·ni·ae

a species first isolated in 1986 and currently recognized as a common cause of pneumonia, bronchitis, rhinosinusitis, and pharyngitis in both adults and children.
Synonym(s): TWAR

Chlamydia pneumoniae is responsible for about 25% of cases of acute bronchitis and 10% of community-acquired pneumonia. It may also play a role in the genesis of cardiovascular disease and late-onset Alzheimer dementia. Like C. trachomatis and C. psittaci, this organism is an occasional cause of myocarditis and endocarditis. Elevated levels of antibody to C. pneumoniae are found in patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI) and in those showing severe atheroma formation at autopsy significantly more often than in control groups. The organism has been detected by immunocytochemistry, polymerase chain reaction, and electron microscopy in macrophages and smooth muscle cells of atheromatous plaques of the aorta, coronary arteries, and carotid arteries (surgical and autopsy specimens), but not in normal arteries. The incidence of acute infection in MI patients, as detected by throat culture, is higher than in the general public. A retrospective review of medical records of patients with acute MI showed that they were less likely than matched controls to have been treated during the preceding 3 years with tetracycline or quinolone antibiotics, which are active against C. pneumoniae. To date, however, prospective studies have not shown an association between the presence of IgG antibody to C. pneumoniae and an increased risk of atherothrombotic disease. The current body of evidence favors infection with C. pneumoniae as one of several factors capable of initiating changes that culminate in atherosclerosis. Limited studies suggest that antibiotic treatment may reduce the risk of recurrent coronary events, but have not shown benefits in stable coronary artery disease. Antibody to C. pneumoniae is also found in patients with severe hypertension at about twice the incidence rate for the general public, and has been linked statistically to accelerated loss of lung function in patients with asthma. In addition, the organism has been detected in microglia and astroglia of the hippocampus and temporal cortex in patients with late-onset Alzheimer disease with much greater frequency than in normal brains.

Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

Chlamydia pneumoniae

C psittaci TWAR A pathogen that causes pneumonia, asymptomatic RTIs, pharyngitis, otitis media
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Chla·myd·o·phil·a pneu·mo·ni·ae

(klă-midō-filă nū-mōnē-ē)
A species that causes pneumonia and upper and lower respiratorydisease. Also called Chlamydia pneumoniae (q.v.), TWAR.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Chla·myd·i·a pneu·mo·ni·ae

(klă-mi'dē-a nū-mō'nē-ē)
A species recognized as a common cause of pneumonia, bronchitis, rhinosinusitis, and pharyngitis.
Synonym(s): TWAR.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
"These drugs could provide an alternative to antibiotics or can be used in conjunction with them as an augmentation approach to treat infections that typically require prolonged courses of antibiotic therapy, such as those caused by Chlamydia pneumoniae and Coxiella burnetti," added Carlyon.
Two possible mechanisms by which infection might predispose to subsequent ischemic heart disease and stroke are via a direct effect whereby pathogens such as Chlamydia pneumoniae are taken up into arterial plaques, where they cause a local inflammatory response, or an indirect effect in which systemic inflammation primes the atherosclerotic plaque through distribution of inflammatory cytokines, according to Dr.
The bacterium Chlamydia pneumoniae is believed to contribute to coronary heart disease (CHD), since it is known to be present in plaques that clog arteries, and an antibiotic called clarithromycin (Biaxin[R]) has been shown to eradicate C.
Eco-epidemiologia de las Chlamydia psittaci, Chlamydia pneumoniae y Chlamydia pecorum: impacto en la salud publica.
Detection of specific Chlamydia pneumoniae and cytomegalovirus antigens in human carotid atherosclerotic plaque in a Chinese population.
Prevalence and persistence of Chlamydia pneumoniae antibodies in healthy laboratory personnel in Finland.
[1] Although a number of different viral, bacterial, fungal and protozoan organisms can cause atypical pneumonia, the three most common are Chlamydia pneumoniae, Legionella pneumophila, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae.
One of the most reported findings is a detection of fragments, DNA and antibodies against Chlamydia pneumoniae, Ch.
Heinze et al., "In vitro activity of levofloxacin against contemporary clinical isolates of Legionella pneumophila, Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae from North America and Europe," Clinical Microbiology and Infection, vol.
Hammerschlag, "Acute respiratory infection due to Chlamydia pneumoniae: current status of diagnostic methods," Clinical Infectious Diseases, vol.