levobupivacaine

(redirected from Chirocaine)

levobupivacaine

 [le″vo-bu-piv´ah-kān]
a local anesthetic used as the hydrochloride salt for local infiltration anesthesia, peripheral nerve block, and epidural anesthesia during surgical procedures and for postoperative pain management.

levobupivacaine

/le·vo·bu·piv·a·caine/ (le″vo-bu-piv´ah-kān) the S enantiomer of bupivacaine; a local anesthetic used as the hydrochloride salt for local infiltration anesthesia, peripheral nerve block, and epidural anesthesia.

levobupivacaine

a local anesthetic.
indications It is used for local and regional anesthesia, for pain management, and for continuous epidural analgesia.
contraindications Severe liver disease and known hypersensitivity to this drug contraindicate its use. It is also contraindicated in children less than 12 years of age and in the elderly.
adverse effects Life-threatening effects are convulsions, loss of consciousness, myocardial depression, cardiac arrest, arrhythmias, fetal bradycardia, status asthmaticus, respiratory arrest, and anaphylaxis. Other adverse effects include anxiety, restlessness, drowsiness, disorientation, tremors, shivering, bradycardia, hypotension, hypertension, nausea, vomiting, blurred vision, tinnitus, pupil constriction, rash, urticaria, allergic reactions, edema, burning, skin discoloration at the injection site, and tissue necrosis.

levobupivacaine

Chirocaine Anesthesiology A long-acting local anesthetic used for pain during childbirth, surgery. See Chiral chemistry.
References in periodicals archive ?
11) After the provocation test, a mixture of long-term corticosteroid (80 mg triamcinolone acetonide, Sinokort-A, IE, Istanbul, Turkey) and local anesthetic (4 cc levobupivocaine hydrochoride, Chirocaine, Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, Illinois USA) was injected, and the injection site was closed.
As shown by the EC investigations, due to the absence of other strong competitors in the market, the exclusive license for Chirocaine constituted the only potential source of competition in this market segment.
Celltech, which also makes the anaesthetic Chirocaine, is a favourite with the City as one of the few profitable biotech groups in Europe.
Celltech had good news about key products, saying that its US partner Purdue Pharma had launched an anaesthetic Chirocaine in North America this year.
Furthermore, in the area of local anaesthetics (where Astra is the world market leader), Zeneca has undertaken to reverse all arrangements relating to Chirocaine, a new long-acting local anaesthetic which Zeneca licensed-in last year.
No one knows this better than Celltech, which had a disappointing pick up of new anaesthetic Chirocaine.
Chiroscience yesterday also revealed it had signed a joint marketing deal with Abbott Laboratories Inc and Purdue Pharma for its anaesthetic Chirocaine.
Celltech, which owns the anaesthetic Chirocaine, fell 46p to pounds 13.
Zeneca bought most of the marketing rights to the Chirocaine anaesthetic as a strong competitor to Astra's rival drugs.
Widely tipped as the next Glaxo Wellcome, Celltech owns a local anaesthetic treatment called Chirocaine and sceptics in the City, including me, think the stock will snooze over the next year or so.