chimera

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chimera

 [ki-me´rah]
an organism whose body contains different cell populations derived from different zygotes of the same or different species, occurring spontaneously or produced artificially.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

chi·me·ra

(kī-mēr'ă, ki-),
1. In experimental embryology, the individual produced by grafting an embryonic part of one animal onto the embryo of another, either of the same or of another species.
2. An organism that has received a transplant of genetically and immunologically different tissue, such as bone marrow.
3. Dizygotic twins that exchange immunologically distinct types of erythrocytes.
4. A protein fusion in which two different proteins are linked through peptide bonds; usually genetically engineered. Chimeric antibodies may have the Fab fragment from one species fused with the Fc fragment from another.
5. Any macromolecule fusion formed by two or more macromolecules from different species or from different genes.
[L. Chimaera, G. Chimaira, mythic monster (lit. a she-goat)]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

chimera

also

chimaera

(kī-mîr′ə, kĭ-)
n.
1.
a. An organism, organ, or part consisting of two or more tissues of different genetic composition, produced as a result of organ transplant, grafting, or genetic engineering.
b. A gene or protein consisting of parts from two different genes or proteins that are normally distinct, sometimes derived from two different species.
2. An individual who has received a transplant of genetically and immunologically different tissue.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

chimera

Any individual organism or molecule derived from 2 or more species.
 
Embryology
An organism that results when an embryonic part of one organism is grafted onto another.

Genetics
An organism with 2 or more cell lines, genotypes or karyotypes descended from at least 2 zygotes. Chimeras are very rare, only occur in twins and result from chorionic vascular anastomoses, transplantations or double fertilisations and subsequent participation of both fertilised meiotic products in one developing embryo; all hermaphrodites should be karyotyped to evaluate possible chimerism.

Molecular biology
(1) An animal formed from two different embryonic sources. In mouse genetics, targeted mutations produced in embryonic stem cells are recovered by breeding chimeric mice, resulting from the mixture of embryonic stem cells with a genetically distinct blastocyst.
(2) A clone containing genomic DNA from nonadjacent genomic segments or cDNA from two different mRNAs.

Transplantation
The term chimera was once used for a person who had received transplanted tissue—e.g., bone marrow surviving in a recipient.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

chi·me·ra

(kī-mēr'ă)
1. The individual produced by grafting an embryonic part of one animal onto the embryo of another, either of the same or of another species.
2. An organism that has received a transplant of genetically and immunologically different tissue, such as bone marrow.
3. Dizygotic twins that have immunologically distinct types of erythrocytes.
4. A protein fusion in which two different proteins, usually from different species, are linked through peptide bonds; usually genetically engineered. Chimeric antibodies may have the Fab fragment from one species fused with the Fc fragment from another.
5. Any macromolecule fusion formed by two or more macromolecules from different species or from different genes.
[L. Chimaera, G. Chimaira, mythic monster (lit. a she-goat)]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

chimera

An organism that contains a mixture of genetically different cells derived from more than one ZYGOTE. A chimera may, for instance, occur as a result of fertilization by more than one spermatozoon; fusion of two zygotes; an ALLOGENEIC bone marrow graft; cell exchange between dizygotic twin fetuses; or combination of portions of embryos of different species. Compare MOSAICISM. The term derives from the name of a mythical monster with a lion's head, a goat's body, and a serpent's tail.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
In fact, these chimeras are just one of the examples of science crossing the blurry line between right and wrong.
Meanwhile, HB 8926, approved on final reading by a vote of 174-0, seeks to regulate the catching, sale, purchase, possession, transportation, importation, and exportation of all sharks, rays, and chimeras nationwide.
There are some who argue against chimeras by claiming that humanity would lose its dignity.
This chimera, created by a team at the Georgia Cancer Center, has the ability to simultaneously decrease the expression of three growth factors that are over-expressed in some cancers.
("Momentous") (OTCBB: MMEG), a diversified media company with a focus on technology that creates, produces and distributes quality content across various media platforms, announced today that it has executed closing documents to acquire the online gaming business, Chimera[c] Games ("Chimera") in an asset only purchase.
As a first step, the researchers created a rat/mouse chimera by introducing rat cells into mouse embryos and letting them mature.
Even so, as a precaution, researchers working with farm-animal chimeras haven't yet permitted any to be born, but instead are collecting fetuses in order to gather preliminary information about how great the contribution of human cells is to the animals' bodies.
It is no wonder, then, that the title of Chimeras (Mika Mattila, 2013), which invokes the hybrid beast of mythology, signals that we should expect no easy truths about contemporary China.
Chimeric CYP21A1P/CYP21A2 genes were the most frequent type of mutation in our patients, with a total allele frequency of 31.4% (127 of 404 alleles), results that are consistent with those of other studies (9).As expected, harboring at least one In2G mutation (as in chimeras CH-1, CH-2, CH-3, CH-5, CH-6, and the newly identified CH-8) was associated with the SW type of CAH, thus constituting the classic group.
Many marine invertebrates have the ability to combine tissues with conspecifics and form chimeras (Buss, 1990).
The process of creating clay gargoyles and chimeras is made to look simple and exciting in this very specific video.
THE BISHOPS' CONFERENCE of England and Wales has argued that human embryos containing animal cells, known as chimeras, should be considered human.